#summersparks Follow-Up: TIPS

Summer SparksTIPS TO FOLLOW A WRITING CHALLENGE

 

My mind is still whirling. What a lot to cover in only two weeks! Sometimes that can leave everything in a jumble. Add several ideas sparking to the mix and you can feel overwhelmed. Here are a few tips I have found that helps me out:

  1. Make a list of your ideas where you can see them all at one time.
  2. Star or check each one that has promise to flesh out into a story.
  3. Look at that group and see which ones are really grabbing your attention.
  4. Pick one or two and start researching, note taking, and writing.

I have found by narrowing them down by importance, I get a better feel for what I want to work on. Of course I have had an occasional loud mouth that demanded attention. When that happens, I KNOW what I want to work on.

Things I also consider before I get too far into my writing:

  1. Has the subject been written about?
  2. Has my angle been written about?
  3. How  can I make my story unique?
  4. What way can I market this idea? (<– Yes, I start that now)
  5. What other layers can I bring into the story to add depth?

There are so many things that come into writing. I have found that the more I do it, the easier steps come. I automatically pull up Amazon and do a search now. My mind starts visualizing ways I can market a book, different ways to promote, and who I can approach, outside of bookstores, to sell my book(s).

The main thing to remember is to BREATHE and enjoy the writing process.

Happy Writing!
~t

 

 DON’T FORGET:

You have three more days to finish qualifying for the raffle prizes!!! All entries must be done by Friday, July 11th, at 11:59 pm, est.

 

Missed a SUMMER SPARK? Don’t worry, you can find them here:

Day 1: In Celebration of Summer Magic  by Kelly Milner Halls
Day 2:  The Power of Doodling  by Alison K. Hertz
Day 3: Cause & Effect  by Alayne Kay Christian
Day 4: How to be a Marketing Ninja  by Corey Rosen Schwartz
Day 5: A Visual Writing Prompt: Begin at the End  by Julie Gribble
Day 6: The Final Word  by Jodi Moore
Day 7: Inspiration Station  by Susanna Hill
Day 8: Voice and Word Choice in Picture Books by Tara Lazar
Day 9: Platform Building Can You Build It? Yes, You Can!  by Tracey M. Cox
Day 10: 5 Ways to Hook Your Reader with Your Very First Line  by Kirsti Call
Day 11: Burning Down the House aka Revision by Donna Earnhardt
Day 12: Persistence  by Donna M. McDine
Day 13: Writing Your Way to a Spark  by Kris Dinnison
Day 14: Hope In Your Heart  by Carol Gordon Ekster
BONUS: What Songs Rock Your World?  by Claire Rudolf Murphy
THAT’S A WRAP!
Follow-up #1: TIPS
Follow-up #2: 9 Ways to Tighten Your Story
Prize Announcement: Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!

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27 thoughts on “#summersparks Follow-Up: TIPS

  1. I totally agree with you. I keep a numbered listing of all my ideas and everything I have written. So far in 11 years of writing my count stands at 226. I give them all a working title and write a short blurb about them.

    I have also found that color coding the numbers works for me… fiction/nonfiction/ poetry/articles each have a different color and I add what genre they are, along with whether or not I’ve worked on them…sloppy copy/second draft/ third draft etc so I know at a glance which ones I’ve worked on and may way to revise a final time before sending them out into the world

  2. I have a small, smooth stone with “Enjoy” on it that I use to remind myself of the joys I get from writing to get myself through the struggles. Thanks for all your advice.

  3. More on genres… I list whether they are PB, CB, MG, YA and then the category… Fable/ Fairytale/ Fantasy/Folklore/Historical/Legend/Mystery/Myth/Romance/Science Fiction etc
    I also mark the manuscripts/story ideas that will need research. It helps immensely that everything is right there at my fingertips when I open the folder.

  4. Here’s an example:

    8. PB/H/R/10 Riv – Hope Hangs By A Thread

    Code means that it is manuscript # 8 and is a PB/ Historical /Research is required/10th revision

  5. Pingback: #summersparks Thursday Thinking: 9 Ways to Tighten Your Story | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  6. Pingback: #summersparks and that’s a wrap! | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  7. Pingback: #summersparks DAY 15 BONUS POST: What Songs Rock Your World? by Claire Rudolf Murphy | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  8. Pingback: #summersparks DAY 14: Hope In Your Heart by Carol Gordon Ekster | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  9. Pingback: #summersparks DAY 13: Writing Your Way To A Spark by: Kris Dinnison | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  10. Pingback: #summersparks 12: Persistence by Donna McDine | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  11. Pingback: #summersparks DAY 11: Burning Down the House by Donna Earnhardt | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  12. Pingback: #summersparks DAY 10: 5 Ways to Hook Your Reader with Your Very First Line by Kirsti Call | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  13. Pingback: #summersparks DAY 9: Building a Platform by: Tracey M. Cox | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  14. Pingback: #summersparks. DAY 8: Voice and Word Choice in Picture Books by Tara Lazar | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  15. Pingback: #summersparks DAY 7: Inspiration Station by Susanna Hill | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  16. Pingback: #summersparks DAY 6: The Final Word by Jodi Moore | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  17. Pingback: #summersparks DAY 5: A Visual Writing Prompt: Begin at the End by Julie Gribble | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  18. Pingback: #summersparks DAY 4: How to be a Marketing Ninja by Corey Rosen Schwartz | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  19. Pingback: #summersparks Day 3: Cause and Effect by Alayne Kay Christian | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  20. Pingback: #summersparks DAY 2: The Power of Doodling by Alison Hertz | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  21. Pingback: #summersparks DAY 1: In Celebration of Summer Magic by: Kelly Halls | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

  22. Pingback: Last Day to qualify for #summersparks | a writers blog by: Tracey M. Cox

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