#SummerSparks Day 10 – Get Out!

Get out!
by: Tracey M. Cox

Have you ever felt stuck with your writing? Like your brain was clumped up and nothing will come out? I know I have… a lot. So what to do? Get out! Yes, I’m shooing you away from your computer. Go take a walk/run? Walk around your yard or neighborhood.

Sometimes stepping away and giving yourself a change of scenery is all you need to do to get the creative juices flowing again.

Maybe you see a new bird? Or flower?  You can research those and incorporate them into your writing. Maybe you like gardening? I have a flower bed and a few of my flowers make an appearance in one of my stories.  🙂

Think about different angles you can write different ideas too. “Honey, I Shrunk the Kids” is a movie that comes to mind where a bugs pov comes into play when the children are shrunk. There are different challenges from each view point. All you have to do is Get Out! and see what’s there in your own backyard.

SPARK:

Go outside and walk around a little bit. Try to notice things: weather, sounds, scents, vegetation, people, animals, etc. Then think how they relate or seem odd. Does something catch your attention? Is there something new? Is there something you’ve wanted to try or have done and would like to do again? What about the time of the year, what do you do that has become a habit?

About Tracey:

Tracey2

Tracey M. Cox has been writing professionally since 2000. She is traditionally published with six picture book out. This Summer, her 7th picture book, The Children at the Playground, will be published by Xist Publishing.
Tracey is the host of Summer Sparks author, platform building consultant, and offers a critique service. Read more about her at www.traceymcox.com.

LINKS:
Website
Facebook
Twitter
Blog
PB Reviews

#GIVEAWAY 2# <—  Yes, #2!

Tracey will be giving away a one hour platform consult at the end of the challenge. COMMENT ON THIS POST to qualify for any give away. *you will need to comment on every give away post*.
TWEET – about this giveaway.
FACEBOOK – post about this giveaway too!!!

Click  —>  a Rafflecopter giveaway   <— to enter giveaway!

:::LEAVE A COMMENT:::
Let me know, are you participating in this years #SummerSparks writing challenge?
Where did your Sun Burst exercise lead you?

* Don’t miss one post! Email sign-ups are over here —>
* Did you enjoy this post? Feel free to LIKE, SHARE, and COMMENT ON THIS POST.
Easy, peasy buttons found  below.
* Sign up for my  N E W S L E T T E R ! I will be sharing writing challenges and other
tidbits related to the kidlit industry. Click  ~HERE~  to be directed to my
Newsletter sign up page.
Shaping Up The Year book       RibbertsWayHome8x300[1]       LGHL-small       justthethingtobe8x300       ADT-8x150       Arachnabet

2015 Summer Sparks post:

  1. Family Celebration by Tracey M. Cox
  2. Back Where I Come From by Tracey M. Cox
  3. The Benefits of Playdough: Molding your PB Idea Into A Story by Donna L. Martin
  4. Go Jump In a Lake by Tracey M. Cox
  5. Take a Vacay! by Tracey M. Cox
  6. How to Rhyme Right in a Picture Book Manuscript by Nancy Raines Day
  7. Don’t You Know that You Are a Shooting Star? by Tracey M. Cox
  8. Sun Burst by Tracey M. Cox
  9. Writing Tips from the Big Bad Writer by Pat Miller
  10. Get Out! by Tracey M. Cox
  11. Pieces by Tracey M. Cox
  12. Make Your Non-Fiction Leap Off the Page! by Jennifer Swanson
  13. Do the Twist by Tracey M. Cox
  14. Celebrate! by Tracey M. Cox

#SummerSparks Day 9 – Writing Tips from the Big Bad Writer by Pat Miller

Summer Sparks Day 9WRITING TIPS FROM THE BIG BAD WRITER
by Pat Miller

One day, Little Red Writing Hood realized she needed some writing tips. She heard that Granny W was a prolific writer, so Little Red packed a basket of treats and decided to visit her.

When Little Red Writing Hood knocked on Granny W’s door, a gruff voice invited her in. Little Red was shocked to learn that Granny W was a wolf!

She started to say, “Hi Granny W, I need some writing advice…” But her train of thought was derailed by Granny’s appearance, and she blurted, “What big ears you have!”

“Yes my dear,” said Granny W. “And those big ears help me get a lot of my ideas. Keep your ears open—some of my best ideas came from overhearing the TV or a conversation at the Critter Café. But don’t forget about your internal ears. Those are the ones that pick up ideas that flit through your dreams or your imagination. I have a notebook with me at all times, in my pocket, by my bed, even one in the shower! Listen to me: you will not remember unless you WRITE IT DOWN!”

girl with notepad“Good point,” said Little Red Writing Hood. “May I borrow some paper to jot this down?” Granny W motioned her to the desk, which was covered with notebooks.

“Grab a notebook,” said Granny W, “I’m just getting started.”

Little Red wanted to ask Granny how to fix a story once she had the first draft. Instead, she said, “What big eyes you have!”

“I do,” said Granny W, “The better to do my rewrites. First, I read my draft looking for ways to punch up the details. You gotta show—use your eyes—instead of tell! Do that by painting a word picture. What would the reader see? Hear? Get my drift?”

“Right,” said Little Red Writing Hood. “First, you make sure you create visuals.”

“Next you have to squint your eyes up and get tough with that story. That’s when you look over every sentence, every word. Is it doing its job? Does it add to the story? Can I cut it out without hurting the story? Then you gotta slice out the lazy words! Scratch off the dull sentences!” Granny punctuated each sentence with a swipe of her claws.

Little Red’s pencil flew over the paper. She wanted to ask how Granny got the gumption to write every day. “What’s your secret for writing every…” before she finished, she was startled by the proximity of Granny’s pearly whites. She couldn’t help herself. “Granny, what big teeth you have!”

“Big teeth, maybe. But I also have tenacity. Know what that means? It’s the ability to bite into my story every day and not let go until it’s finished!” said Granny W.

“But how? I try to write every day, but it gets overwhelming and then I resist even going to my desk,” said Little Red.

“Small and steady is the secret,” revealed Granny. “Tell yourself you only have to write for 10 minutes a day. Just ten! Now how can you resist sitting down for that little dab of time? After 10 minutes, you can quit for the day. Celebrate. Give yourself a gold star for accomplishing your goal. Of course, you might find yourself writing for more than 10, but that’s not a must.”

“I can write for 10 minutes,” said Little Red Writing Hood. “That’s not scary at all.”

“Do it every day—it adds up quickly. Plus, you feel good about yourself for meeting your goals. Small is better than nothing. Tell you what I’m going to do. I’m going to show you my Star Chart.” Granny W pointed to a cabinet. Open that door and see what’s taped inside.”

“Wow, that’s a lot of stars! What are the two faces for? They aren’t happy or sad,” said Little Red.

“Well, I learned that no matter how big my teeth, how determined my intention, life gets away from me sometimes and I can’t even make my small goal. But I don’t beat myself up. I just draw a face that means try again tomorrow.”

“Got it,” said Little Red. “Take a Bite Daily.”

Little Red started to say something else when BING! a story idea popped into her head. Quickly, she jotted it down. “Granny, here are some goodies for you. But I’ve got an idea burning a hole in my brain. Gotta run!”

As Little Red Writing Hood ran out the door, she heard Granny W say, “What good instincts you have!”

SPARK:

1. Fiction Prompt The best question to ask is “What if?” Choose a folk or fairy tale and turn it on its head.

  • What if Cinderella didn’t want to let the prince try on the glass slipper because she had such ugly feet?

  • What if the three Billy Goats Gruff had the little one go last, and she bested the troll because she was very good at tickling?

  • What if instead of a gingerbread boy it was a mischievous three-year old running from his mother, his babysitter, his preschool teacher, etc.

Make a list of five tales. Next, figure out not one, but three different ways you could twist the story. This is an excellent way to free your imagination from its confines. Then choose one of your 15 ideas to write about.

2. Nonfiction prompt: Your inciting questions are the 5 w’s and how. Go to Important Dates in American History: or Origins of Everyday Things. Make a list of several events or people, and come up with questions for each.

For example:

1886 Geronimo surrenders – Why did he surrender? Who did he surrender to? What happened to him?

Next, choose one you know least about from your list. Do ten minutes of Internet research. Based on what you learned, what hook could you use to tell children about it? One possibility, Geronimo was an American prisoner of war for 23 years. How does that compare with how America treated its prisoners of war in the Civil War, or in one of the World Wars? Another hook: In Geronimo’s formative years, the Mexican government offered $25 for an Apache child’s scalp. How did that affect Geronimo’s outlook on life?

Bonuses

  • Big Teeth: Use this Star Chart to keep track of your own ten-minute tenacity. Choose your favorite color each day you write for 10 minutes. Use the non-judgmental face if you don’t. Just don’t give up! [Ten Minute Tenacity Chart]
  • Big Eyes: Go here  to see the first version of Pat’s first book, Substitute Groundhog, and the final version (written after 32 rejections). You can see that very little remained the same.

ABOUT PAT:

Pat Miller photoPat Miller has been writing since she was a kid, but started getting paid when she began writing on the side as an adult. At the time, she was the mother of three young kids and worked full time as an elementary teacher and school librarian. SO MANY BOOKS!

She now works full time writing children’s books and teaching adults about writing. She is also a certified Master Gardener, and gets some of her ideas while pulling weeds or watering her gardens.

As a freelance writer and contributing editor for LibrarySparks, Pat has published more than 200 professional articles, 20 books for school librarians, and a number of books for children. Three of them are Substitute Groundhog (Junior Library Guild book), Squirrel’s New Year’s Resolution, and her upcoming nonfiction book, The Hole Story of the Doughnut (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, May 2016)

She and her husband have twin sons, a daughter, and six preschool grandkids, including twins. Reading to them and buying them books are two of the joys of being a grandmother. She lives in the Houston area and has an illiterate Jack Russell terrier that lies by her feet when she writes.

LINKS:
Website
Blog
Facebook
NF 4 NF: Children’s Nonfiction Writing Conference

 

:::LEAVE A COMMENT:::
Let me know, are you participating  in this years #SummerSparks writing challenge?
Do you have any interesting places or people in your area?

* Don’t miss one post! Email sign-ups are over here —>
* Did you enjoy this post? Feel free to LIKE, SHARE, and COMMENT ON THIS POST.
Easy, peasy buttons found  below.
* Sign up for my  N E W S L E T T E R ! I will be sharing writing challenges and other
tidbits related to the kidlit industry. Click  ~HERE~  to be directed to my
Newsletter sign up page.
Shaping Up The Year book       RibbertsWayHome8x300[1]       LGHL-small       justthethingtobe8x300       ADT-8x150       Arachnabet

2015 Summer Sparks post:

  1. Family Celebration by Tracey M. Cox
  2. Back Where I Come From by Tracey M. Cox
  3. The Benefits of Playdough: Molding your PB Idea Into A Story by Donna L. Martin
  4. Go Jump In a Lake by Tracey M. Cox
  5. Take a Vacay! by Tracey M. Cox
  6. How to Rhyme Right in a Picture Book Manuscript by Nancy Raines Day
  7. Don’t You Know that You Are a Shooting Star? by Tracey M. Cox
  8. Sun Burst by Tracey M. Cox
  9. Writing Tips from the Big Bad Writer by Pat Miller
  10. Get Out! by Tracey M. Cox
  11. Pieces by Tracey M. Cox
  12. Make Your Non-Fiction Leap Off the Page! by Jennifer Swanson
  13. Do the Twist by Tracey M. Cox
  14. Celebrate! by Tracey M. Cox

#SummerSparks Day 8 – Sun Burst

Summer Sparks Day 8Sun Burst
by: Tracey M. Cox

Oh Myyyy! We are into our second-half of #SummerSparks already!!! I can’t believe it. I hope your ideas have been sparking and maybe a few have been on fi-ahhh!

For the last part of the challenge, my post will be about different techniques I use to help me come up with different ideas.

Sun burst is a great way to come up with random ideas. They are also called cloud bunch or branching out. Here’s what you need to do:

  1. In the middle of the page write a random word
  2. Around that word, write words that associate with the 1st word.
  3. Around those words, write words which associate with them.
  4. And so on and so forth

Try not to think about it. Go as fast as you can. By doing this, you will begin to see one of more words get a lot of association. Now how can you incorporate this into a story? The great thing about this exercise, is that what you write about may or may not have anything to do with your original idea.

SPARK:

Get a piece of paper. In the center write the word : banana 
Now, see where it will lead you.  🙂

About Tracey:

Tracey2

Tracey M. Cox has been writing professionally since 2000. She is traditionally published with six picture book out. This Summer, her 7th picture book, The Children at the Playground, will be published by Xist Publishing.
Tracey is the host of Summer Sparks author, platform building consultant, and offers a critique service. Read more about her at www.traceymcox.com.

LINKS:
Website
Facebook
Twitter
Blog
PB Reviews

#GIVEAWAY 2# <—  Yes, #2!

Tracey will be giving away a one hour platform consult at the end of the challenge. COMMENT ON THIS POST to qualify for any give away. *you will need to comment on every give away post*.
TWEET – about this giveaway.
FACEBOOK – post about this giveaway too!!!

Click  —>  a Rafflecopter giveaway   <— to enter giveaway!

 

:::LEAVE A COMMENT:::
Let me know, are you participating in this years #SummerSparks writing challenge?
Where did your Sun Burst exercise lead you?

* Don’t miss one post! Email sign-ups are over here —>
* Did you enjoy this post? Feel free to LIKE, SHARE, and COMMENT ON THIS POST.
Easy, peasy buttons found  below.
* Sign up for my  N E W S L E T T E R ! I will be sharing writing challenges and other
tidbits related to the kidlit industry. Click  ~HERE~  to be directed to my
Newsletter sign up page.
Shaping Up The Year book       RibbertsWayHome8x300[1]       LGHL-small       justthethingtobe8x300       ADT-8x150       Arachnabet

2015 Summer Sparks post:

  1. Family Celebration by Tracey M. Cox
  2. Back Where I Come From by Tracey M. Cox
  3. The Benefits of Playdough: Molding your PB Idea Into A Story by Donna L. Martin
  4. Go Jump In a Lake by Tracey M. Cox
  5. Take a Vacay! by Tracey M. Cox
  6. How to Rhyme Right in a Picture Book Manuscript by Nancy Raines Day
  7. Don’t You Know that You Are a Shooting Star? by Tracey M. Cox
  8. Sun Burst by Tracey M. Cox
  9. Writing Tips from the Big Bad Writer by Pat Miller
  10. Get Out! by Tracey M. Cox
  11. Pieces by Tracey M. Cox
  12. Make Your Non-Fiction Leap Off the Page! by Jennifer Swanson
  13. Do the Twist by Tracey M. Cox
  14. Celebrate! by Tracey M. Cox

#SummerSparks Day 7 – Don’t You Know that You Are a Shooting Star?

Summer Sparks Day 7Don’t You Know that You Are a Shooting Star?
by: Tracey M. Cox

Have you ever wanted to meet a super star? Someone famous. Someone who has made an impact in the world. Maybe in your own area.

You might be closer to someone than you thought.

When I searched, I found that Dave Prater (of Sam & Dave) was from Ocilla, Georgia!!!  0.0  Wahhhhhh??? You’re not sure you’ve heard of him? Well let me help you get a little groove on today…

Not too shabby Ocilla. Not too shabby at all.

Ocilla is also home of a few football players: Walt Sumner and Justin “Bean” Anderson.   Woot! Woot!

See even a small town like mine has some shooting star. Who knows maybe one day we will be shooting beside them! Keep reaching peeps!

SPARK:

Go to Google. Type in “Famous People from” and enter in your “City, State”. Or you can enter in just your state. You might be surprised to see how many shooting stars are near you.

About Tracey:

Tracey2

Tracey M. Cox has been writing professionally since 2000. She is traditionally published with six picture book out. This Summer, her 7th picture book, The Children at the Playground, will be published by Xist Publishing.
Tracey is the host of Summer Sparks author, platform building consultant, and offers a critique service. Read more about her at www.traceymcox.com.

LINKS:
Website
Facebook
Twitter
Blog
PB Reviews

#GIVEAWAY#

Tracey will be giving away one full critique at the end of the challenge. COMMENT ON THIS POST to qualify for any give away. *you will need to comment on every give away post*.
TWEET – about this giveaway.
FACEBOOK – post about this giveaway too!!!

Click  —> a Rafflecopter giveaway  <— to enter giveaway!

:::LEAVE A COMMENT:::
Let me know, are you participating in this years #SummerSparks writing challenge?
What shooting stars did you find in your area?

* Don’t miss one post! Email sign-ups are over here —>
* Did you enjoy this post? Feel free to LIKE, SHARE, and COMMENT ON THIS POST.
Easy, peasy buttons found  below.
* Sign up for my  N E W S L E T T E R ! I will be sharing writing challenges and other
tidbits related to the kidlit industry. Click  ~HERE~  to be directed to my
Newsletter sign up page.
Shaping Up The Year book       RibbertsWayHome8x300[1]       LGHL-small       justthethingtobe8x300       ADT-8x150       Arachnabet

2015 Summer Sparks post:

  1. Family Celebration by Tracey M. Cox
  2. Back Where I Come From by Tracey M. Cox
  3. The Benefits of Playdough: Molding your PB Idea Into A Story by Donna L. Martin
  4. Go Jump In a Lake by Tracey M. Cox
  5. Take a Vacay! by Tracey M. Cox
  6. How to Rhyme Right in a Picture Book Manuscript by Nancy Raines Day
  7. Don’t You Know that You Are a Shooting Star? by Tracey M. Cox
  8. Sun Burst by Tracey M. Cox
  9. Writing Tips from the Big Bad Writer by Pat Miller
  10. Get Out! by Tracey M. Cox
  11. Pieces by Tracey M. Cox
  12. Make Your Non-Fiction Leap Off the Page! by Jennifer Swanson
  13. Do the Twist by Tracey M. Cox
  14. Celebrate! by Tracey M. Cox

#SummerSparks Day 6 – How to Rhyme Right in a Picture Book Manuscript by Nancy Raines Day

How to Rhyme Right in a Picture Book Manuscript
by: Nancy Raines Day

Rhyme and/or prose?

First off, let me say, if you don’t feel you have to tell your story in rhyme—DON’T! It’s hard to do right—and prose may be the better choice. Besides, some editors are prejudiced against rhyming books, not because kids don’t love rhyme, but because they see so much bad rhyme. Unfortunately, bad rhyme is much easier to write!

Even if you feel your story must be in rhyme, consider writing it in prose first. That way, you can concentrate on how the story should go. You’ll also find out what words you choose to use to best tell your story.

This will help you eliminate some of the pitfalls of rhyming texts. It’s all too tempting to let what rhymes dictate what happens next in the story. And instead of choosing the best word, you may go with the rhyming word.

But once you have the story down in prose, look at the words you may want to emphasize by putting them at the end of a line. Words that have lots of possible rhymes—or even one rhyme that is relevant to you story—can go at the end of rhyming lines. Using one of the many online rhyming dictionaries will give you the full range of possibilities.

Do everything you can to use only perfect rhymes. Drawing examples from my latest rhyming (non-fiction!) picture book, Way Down Below Deep, eyes and size and herd and blurred are perfect rhymes, as are assistand resist and seeing and fleeing. Anyone can rhyme moon and June—strive for an unexpected rhyme to surprise and delight your readers.

Realistically, though, when you’re trying to get across information or telling a story, you may need to use an imperfect or slant rhyme once in a while. Worms and turns furnish one example of slant rhymes; multitudes and food furnish another. You can maybe get away with one or two slant rhymes in the course of a picture book manuscript, but the rest should be perfect to get an editor’s attention.

When you’re putting a text in rhyme from prose, try to keep mentally flexible. You’ll get better at getting in this zone the more you do it. There are many ways to say whatever you want to say. Some of them are natural-sounding and kid-like, and some aren’t. (Inverting subject-verb order or adjective-noun order is almost never a good idea, for example.)

Have you got rhythm?

Many authors focus on making a text rhyme and forget that a regular rhythm is equally important. Poetry without rhythm is like music without a beat.

Rhythm comes from the accented and unaccented (or stressed and unstressed) syllables of the words. They may come in pairs of STRESSED/unstressed as they do in these lines from my On a Windy Night:

THROUGH dark WOODS and DOWN a HILL,

The BOY walks FAST—and FASTer STILL.

Each of the lines typically has four such pairs, or feet.

That works well as the story picks up speed as the boy’s panic sets in. When his fears prove to be unfounded at the end, I switched to a more leisurely rhythm of unstressed/unstressed/stressed for the first and third “feet” of the first line:

When the CLOUDS roll BY, a full MOON shines BRIGHT.

Whatever rhythm you choose, it’s important to set up a pattern—and stick to it. When I’m writing rhyme, or critiquing someone else’s, I put a short vowel mark over unstressed syllables and a long vowel mark over stressed syllables as I read it out loud. Then I mark off the feet and see what the pattern is and how well each stanza adheres. A few exceptions are allowed, and may even help make it less sing-songy, but only a few.

Sometimes an author “fudges” when reading his or her own work to make it fit the intended pattern. It helps to have someone else read your work. Listen for places your designated reader trips or tries to accent the wrong syl-LAB-le. A critique group is invaluable for catching these places!

Coming up with a text that tells your story with the right pacing, the perfect words, AND has regular rhyme and rhythm is like completing a really tough jigsaw puzzle. It took me 8 years to get On a Windy Night to its published state. But, oh, the feeling of accomplishment when you finally feel like you’ve nailed it makes it all worthwhile!

Squid Pic

SPARK:

Writing in rhyme can be freeing too. Pick a favorite story written in prose, now give it a twist and make it rhyme. Or do the opposite.

 

About Nancy:

NRD postcard

Nancy Raines Day’s What in the World? Numbers in Nature, to be published by Beach Lane Books this fall, will be her fifth (out of nine) rhyming picture book. She is also a freelance editor specializing in critiquing picture books for SCBWI members.

WDBD cover       what-in-the-world-9781481400602_lg

LINKS:
WEBSITE
Rhythm in Poetry

 

:::LEAVE A COMMENT:::
Let me know, are you participating  in this years #SummerSparks writing challenge?
Do you like to write in rhyme? Does rhyming get you tongue-tied?

* Don’t miss one post! Email sign-ups are over here —>
* Did you enjoy this post? Feel free to LIKE, SHARE, and COMMENT ON THIS POST.
Easy, peasy buttons found  below.
* Sign up for my  N E W S L E T T E R ! I will be sharing writing challenges and other
tidbits related to the kidlit industry. Click  ~HERE~  to be directed to my
Newsletter sign up page.
Shaping Up The Year book       RibbertsWayHome8x300[1]       LGHL-small       justthethingtobe8x300       ADT-8x150       Arachnabet

2015 Summer Sparks post:

  1. Family Celebration by Tracey M. Cox
  2. Back Where I Come From by Tracey M. Cox
  3. The Benefits of Playdough: Molding your PB Idea Into A Story by Donna L. Martin
  4. Go Jump In a Lake by Tracey M. Cox
  5. Take a Vacay! by Tracey M. Cox
  6. How to Rhyme Right in a Picture Book Manuscript by Nancy Raines Day
  7. Don’t You Know that You Are a Shooting Star? by Tracey M. Cox
  8. Sun Burst by Tracey M. Cox
  9. Writing Tips from the Big Bad Writer by Pat Miller
  10. Get Out! by Tracey M. Cox
  11. Pieces by Tracey M. Cox
  12. Make Your Non-Fiction Leap Off the Page! by Jennifer Swanson
  13. Do the Twist by Tracey M. Cox
  14. Celebrate! by Tracey M. Cox

#SummerSparks Day 5 – Take a Vacay!

Summer Sparks Day 5

Take a Vacay!
by: Tracey M. Cox

Vacations are supposed to be fun or relaxing, right? You can turn it into a learning adventure too.

I remember the trips my family would take twice a year, from Rochester, NY to Irwin County, Georgia. I always looked forward to stopping at the rest stops and gas stations to pick up the little brochures which featured the local highlights.

I would daydream about going to underground caves. Or walking through a castle. There were trails I wanted to explore and houses that had things that went bump in the night. There are local attractions too, like a historical site, state parks, and theme parks.

Have I ever done any of these? Yep! I’ve gone to ‘See Rock City’ in Tennessee. I’ve gone to Stone Mountain in Georgia. I’ve walked the halls of the Builtmore Estate in North Carolina. I’ve tip-toed around Savannah hoping to see a ghost.  😉  I’ve walked the grounds close by my house where Jefferson Davis was captured.

Are there stories there? SURE! All I have to do is be ready to capture them.

SPARK:

Go to Google. (I love google. Can you tell?  🙂   ) Type in Local Attractions” in “City, State” and be prepared to go on a mini-vacay with your explorations.

About Tracey:

Tracey2

Tracey M. Cox has been writing professionally since 2000. She is traditionally published with six picture book out. This Summer, her 7th picture book, The Children at the Playground, will be published by Xist Publishing.
Tracey is the host of Summer Sparks, author, platform building consultant, and offers a critique service. Read more about her at www.traceymcox.com.

LINKS:
Website
Facebook
Twitter
Blog
PB Reviews

#GIVEAWAY#

Tracey will be giving away one full critique at the end of the challenge. COMMENT ON THIS POST to qualify for any give away. *you will need to comment on every give away post*.
TWEET – about this giveaway.
FACEBOOK – post about this giveaway too!!!

Click  —> a Rafflecopter giveaway  <— to enter giveaway!

:::LEAVE A COMMENT:::
Let me know, are you participating in this years #SummerSparks writing challenge?
What local attractions do you have in your area?
Are there places you’ve visited that inspire a story?

 

* Don’t miss one post! Email sign-ups are over here —>
* Did you enjoy this post? Feel free to LIKE, SHARE, and COMMENT ON THIS POST.
Easy, peasy buttons found  below.
* Sign up for my  N E W S L E T T E R ! I will be sharing writing challenges and other
tidbits related to the kidlit industry. Click  ~HERE~  to be directed to my
Newsletter sign up page.
Shaping Up The Year book       RibbertsWayHome8x300[1]       LGHL-small       justthethingtobe8x300       ADT-8x150       Arachnabet

2015 Summer Sparks post:

  1. Family Celebration by Tracey M. Cox
  2. Back Where I Come From by Tracey M. Cox
  3. The Benefits of Playdough: Molding your PB Idea Into A Story by Donna L. Martin
  4. Go Jump In a Lake by Tracey M. Cox
  5. Take a Vacay! by Tracey M. Cox
  6. How to Rhyme Right in a Picture Book Manuscript by Nancy Raines Day
  7. Don’t You Know that You Are a Shooting Star? by Tracey M. Cox
  8. Sun Burst by Tracey M. Cox
  9. Writing Tips from the Big Bad Writer by Pat Miller
  10. Get Out! by Tracey M. Cox
  11. Pieces by Tracey M. Cox
  12. Make Your Non-Fiction Leap Off the Page! by Jennifer Swanson
  13. Do the Twist by Tracey M. Cox
  14. Celebrate! by Tracey M. Cox

#SummerSparks Day 4 – Go Jump In a Lake

Summer Sparks Day 4Go Jump In a Lake
by: Tracey M. Cox

NO, seriously. Go jump in a lake, or the ocean, or a pool. WHY? Because today is National Swim-A-Lap Day. Yay! And you thought I was being mean. *   tsk, tsk  😉   * 

There are many unsung holidays or national days that many of us don’t know about. Like National Hug Day… Or Bring your Dog to Work Day (I would NOT get any work done that day!)… And more.

By immersing yourself into new ideas, you can come up with some great story starters. I like to see what is out there and wait to see which ideas will float to the top, waiting to be written.

So splash on into the idea pool, take a lap,  and see what you can come up with today.

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SPARK:

Go to Google. Type in “Silly Holidays” or “National Days” and begin exploring the unusual days we haven’t been celebrating!

About Tracey:

Tracey2

Tracey M. Cox has been writing professionally since 2000. She is traditionally published with six picture book out. This Summer, her 7th picture book, The Children at the Playground, will be published by Xist Publishing.
Tracey is the host of Summer Sparks, author, platform building consultant, and offers a critique service. Read more about her at www.traceymcox.com.

LINKS:
Website
Facebook
Twitter
Blog
PB Reviews

#GIVEAWAY#

Tracey will be giving away one full critique at the end of the challenge. COMMENT ON THIS POST to qualify for any give away. *you will need to comment on every give away post*.
TWEET – about this giveaway.
FACEBOOK – post about this giveaway too!!!

Click  —> a Rafflecopter giveaway  <— to enter giveaway!

:::LEAVE A COMMENT:::
Let me know, are you participating  in this years #SummerSparks writing challenge?
Do you have any interesting places or people in your area?

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2015 Summer Sparks post:

  1. Family Celebration by Tracey M. Cox
  2. Back Where I Come From by Tracey M. Cox
  3. The Benefits of Playdough: Molding your PB Idea Into A Story by Donna L. Martin
  4. Go Jump In a Lake by Tracey M. Cox
  5. Take a Vacay! by Tracey M. Cox
  6. How to Rhyme Right in a Picture Book Manuscript by Nancy Raines Day
  7. Don’t You Know that You Are a Shooting Star? by Tracey M. Cox
  8. Sun Burst by Tracey M. Cox
  9. Writing Tips from the Big Bad Writer by Pat Miller
  10. Get Out! by Tracey M. Cox
  11. Pieces by Tracey M. Cox
  12. Make Your Non-Fiction Leap Off the Page! by Jennifer Swanson
  13. Do the Twist by Tracey M. Cox
  14. Celebrate! by Tracey M. Cox