Marketing Monday… Showing Support

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Show Support – Market Yourself by Supporting Others

I know I’ve said this thousands of times, but NO ONE likes to be bonked over the head with a “Buy Me!” attitude. So how can you get your name out there? Show support of others. Yes, talk about them. What have they produced as far as content? Do they give great advice on their blog? What about classes or community awareness?

But you would like to be known better locally too, right? So go to those mom & pop stores, get to know what they carry, and how they come across to their customers and community. What about finding something for your town/city to rally behind? Find a common cause and gather some people together. Make videos, common posts, create hashtags to go with it, and use social media to your benefit.

Chances are, if you start talking and supporting others, they will want to do the same for your. Let’s face it, reciprocity rocks! Another plus is that you will be building a part of your platform. Think of it as a support group. The more people involved the more they can share and communicate with. This will help get your name out there into the public’s eye and social media.

:::LEAVE ME A COMMENT:::
What suggestions do you have to support others?
I am planning on offering a free mini-commercial for the local businesses in my town. What better way to say Happy Holidays?!?
Are you proactive in your own marketing?
This will help others see that you are not afraid to post and have a good following.

Until next time…

Happy Writing!
~t

 OH, A HEADS UP!

I have decided to take the last two weeks off this year. I want to take some time for myself, focus on family, and the true meaning of the season. My last bloggy post will be next Thursday, December 18th.  🙂

 

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***I will be starting a NEWSLETTER in the New Year! Click  ~HERE~  to be directed to my Newsletter sign-up page.

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#summersparks DAY 11: Burning Down the House by Donna Earnhardt

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Burning Down the House (aka Revision)
By Donna Earnhardt

 

In 1958, George Plimpton interviewed Ernest Hemingway and asked about his rewriting process. This is part of that interaction:

INTERVIEWER: How much rewriting do you do?

 

HEMINGWAY:  It depends. I rewrote the ending to Farewell to Arms, the last page of it, thirty-nine times before I was satisfied.

 

INTERVIEWER: Was there some technical problem there? What was it that had stumped you?

 

HEMINGWAY: Getting the words right.

— The Art of Fiction No. 21,

Paris Review, Spring 1958, No. 18

 

It is my opinion that revision can be just as hard as writing the original story. And sometimes, even harder.

 

The Process

There’s this thing I do that drives my kids batty enough to grow wings and hang upside down in caves.

I don’t make them dissect Hemingway’s work or memorize Shakespeare over the summer. I don’t make them scrub the bathroom floor with a toothbrush or wash their clothes by hand in the creek.

So what is the terrible, horrible, no good thing that I do?

I ask my kids to listen to all manuscript revisions. It’s part of my process. And they usually indulge me. I pay them in chocolate, so it’s a win-win. But does it really help? Yes… and no.

My early process looks something like this:

1. Write part of the manuscript, reworking it as I go.

2. Finally finish it. Then shuffle a few more things around.

3. Read it aloud to my kids.

4. Watch their faces, then have them give feedback

5. Rewrite parts that were not received as they should have been. Rearranging what I can.

6. Reread it to the kids.

7. Note their giggles… and their silence.

8. Feed them chocolate.

9. Promise I won’t read it but a couple more times.

10. Tweak again, then read it aloud one last time

11. START TRUE/DEEP REVISIONS.

Notice that my true revisions don’t start until after the early revision. And if I’m being honest with myself, my early revision is more like rearrangement.

Rearrangement of my manuscript is the equivalent of moving around my couch, lamp and table in my house. Same stuff, different place. Maybe I get rid of the junk on top of the entertainment center. It feels a lot cleaner. But it’s the same ol’, same ol’.  In my manuscript, (just like in my house), moving stuff around happens all the time. So that can be part of the process of revision. But it is NOT true revision.

My true revisions don’t start until after I’ve already written a rough draft, read it aloud a few times and rearranged some stuff. True revision looks like more like a new couch, newly painted walls and new rugs. (And maybe a few demolished walls!)

Truly, there are days that my revision looks like gutting the whole house. I might salvage the beginning, middle and end. But even those are subject to the recycling pile. I’ve even considered burning the whole thing down and starting from scratch. Unless, of course, I have a perfect first draft.

But let me be honest… that’s never happened.

So while I’m gutting my masterpiece, what are some things that help me work through the process without banging my head against a newly painted wall?

· I ask my critique buddies for honest (and sometimes brutal) critiques. They can see things that I am temporarily blind to. I get a type of “see-sickness”. They help bring my vision back in focus.

· I am willing to hear with my head AND my heart that my story has parts that stink. If my characters are shallow, I need to know. If my plot is weak, I need to strengthen it. If my premise is tired, it’s my job to fix it. I don’t need to waste precious time trying to defend my manuscript. Either it works, or it doesn’t. And if it doesn’t, I need to make it work.

· I read my work backwards. Yes, it sounds weird. But reading the storyline backwards helps me see things that might be out of whack. Reading backwards also helps visualize timeline issues and plot holes.

· If I’m writing a picture book in rhyme, I try to rewrite it in prose. I might end up sticking with the rhyming version, but putting it in prose helps me see where plot issues might be. It also helps me determine if rhyming or non-rhyming is the best vehicle for the story.

· I get rid of characters that don’t move the story along. Even if I love a character, he (or she) might serve only one purpose – such as comedic relief. I can attribute that one characteristic to a more important character, especially if I find out one of my characters is shallow. This could help give that character depth.

· I make sure the beginning, middle and end are solid. If the first page of a book doesn’t grab a reader, the rest of the book might not get the chance to redeem itself. The beginning needs to be unforgettable. The ending needs to make me sad the book is over, but still be satisfying. The middle of the story? It’s like the kitchen. It supplies the reader with the “meat”. Without it, the readers are hungry and angry — hangry. And we know that never ends well.

· I get rid of situations that aren’t appropriate for the story. For instance, in Being Frank, the “carnival scene” was once a school dance. But as my wonderful editor pointed out, this book was aimed at 3-7 year olds. They don’t have to deal with school dances for at least a few more years.

· I make sure my big girl panties are on. This business is tough. We can’t settle for “okay”. We can’t settle for “it’s better than what’s on the bookshelves now”. That is a slippery slope that leads to mediocrity. And mediocrity is not what agents or editors are looking for. I am not suggesting losing your vision in exchange for someone else’s. But we need to be willing to re-vision our story to make the vision come to life.

Some great go-to resources for help with revision:

1. Revision & Self-Editing: Techniques for Transforming Your First Draft Into a Finished Novel by James Scott Bell

2. 9-1-1 help for Revising your Picture book by Cynthea Liu http://www.writingforchildrenandteens.com/revision/revision-9-1-1-for-fiction-picture-books/

3. Second Sight — General Help for all writers of children’s books by Cheryl Klein http://cherylklein.com/second-sight/

 

One last thing… I ran across an interview that Kelly Barnhill gave on John Brown’s blog. She makes a good point that is worth printing and pasting on our computers…

“That’s the magic of revisions – every cut is necessary, and every cut hurts, but something new always grows.”  — Kelly Barnhill

(for more of her interview, check it out here: http://johndbrown.com/2011/02/interview-with-author-kelly-barnhill/)

 

p.s. And if you’re wondering, I read this post aloud to my oldest kiddo. She’s now demanding chocolate.

 DONNA EARNHARDT
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Bio: Donna Earnhardt is the author of Being Frank, illustrated by Andrea Castellani (Flashlight press, 2012). When Donna isn’t homeschooling her three children, chauffeuring them from place to place, or battling the laundry, she’s writing children’s stories, poetry, songs, and mysteries. You might find her fishing the Pee Dee River, hiking in the mountains with her family (while simultaneously keeping an eye out for Bigfoot) or visiting her hometown of Cordova, NC. She lives in Concord, NC, and Being Frank is her first picture book.
DONNA IS THE AUTHOR OF:
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FIND DONNA:

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Twitter: @Donna_Earnhardt
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Writing Prompt:
Hi everyone. Tracey here.
One writing exercise I like to do is called scenes from the hat. I gather different characters in one pile, different problems in another one, and setting in a third pile. Place your character pile into a hat, swish around, and pull one. Remove the pile and do the same with the problem and setting piles. Now look at your character, his or her problem, and their setting… Now GO!

Characters
King
Chipmunks
Girl
Boy
Farmer
Skater

Problem
Heir to thorn
Winter
Food
Broken ?
Scared
________

Setting
Forest
Beach
City
Moon
Country
Store

 

Missed a SUMMER SPARK? Don’t worry, you can find them here:

Day 1: In Celebration of Summer Magic  by Kelly Milner Halls
Day 2:  The Power of Doodling  by Alison K. Hertz
Day 3: Cause & Effect  by Alayne Kay Christian
Day 4: How to be a Marketing Ninja  by Corey Rosen Schwartz
Day 5: A Visual Writing Prompt: Begin at the End  by Julie Gribble
Day 6: The Final Word  by Jodi Moore
Day 7: Inspiration Station  by Susanna Hill
Day 8: Voice and Word Choice in Picture Books by Tara Lazar
Day 9: Platform Building Can You Build It? Yes, You Can!  by Tracey M. Cox
Day 10: 5 Ways to Hook Your Reader with Your Very First Line  by Kirsti Call
Day 11: Burning Down the House aka Revision by Donna Earnhardt
Day 12: Persistence  by Donna M. McDine
Day 13: Writing Your Way to a Spark  by Kris Dinnison
Day 14: Hope In Your Heart  by Carol Gordon Ekster
BONUS: What Songs Rock Your World?  by Claire Rudolf Murphy
THAT’S A WRAP!
Follow-up #1: TIPS
Follow-up #2: 9 Ways to Tighten Your Story
Prize Announcement: Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!

#summersparks DAY 10: 5 Ways to Hook Your Reader with Your Very First Line by Kirsti Call

Summer Sparks5 Ways to Hook your Reader with Your Very First Line
By Kirsti Call

 

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Richard Peck said: “You’re only as good as your opening line.” How do we keep our readers intrigued and wanting more? Here are five ideas to get our juices flowing.

 

1. Ask a question.  Asking a question gets readers thinking. Not a Box immediately asks: “Why are you sitting in a box?”  We want to turn the page to find out the answer. The Day the Babies Crawled Away questions: “Remember the day the babies crawled away?”  This piques our interest.  We want to know what happened on that fateful day.  Did the babies survive?  Where did they go?

2. Make people wonder.    The first line in A Christmas Carol is: “Marley was dead to begin with.” This makes us wonder how he is involved in the story as a dead character.

3. Take People by Surprise. Mustache Baby declares: “When Baby Billy was born, his family noticed something odd: He had a mustache.”  A baby with a mustache?  We have to read on.  Leonardo the Terrible Monster tells us: “Leonardo was a terrible monster…he couldn’t scare anyone.”  A monster who isn’t scary?  I can’t wait to turn the page.

4. State an opinion.    Pride and Prejudice starts with an opinion that foreshadows the theme of the book and makes you want to read on:  “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”

5. Use word play. Being Frank starts with: “Frank was always frank” and  Bridget’s Beret is similar: “Bridget was drawn to drawing.”  There’s nothing  better than the clever use of words to get people wanting more.

Kirsti Call

Kirsti Call

I love everything about reading.  I love the weight of a book in my hands.  I love the way words create pictures in my head and bring me to another world.  I love how books teach me about life and love and who I am and who I want to be.

As a kid I couldn’t help reading all day.  I hid my book under my desk and read in class.  I read as I walked home from school, always slightly surprised out of my reverie by the elderly lady in the neighborhood who announced: “There goes the bookworm again!”  

I had reading parties with my siblings.  The five of us piled on top of each other like kindling in a fire, our limbs touching as our minds burned with the need to read.   After bedtime I read with a flashlight, my book hidden under the covers as I forced myself to stay awake for just one more page.

My love of reading made writing a necessity.  If only I could write things in a way that would help people want to crawl inside my book and never leave!  I hope you enjoy my books. Thanks for visiting!

–     –     –     –     –     –

Kirsti Call lives near Andover, MA with her husband and five children.

She loves reading, writing and singing.

On sunny days you will find her on the tire swing in her backyard and on rainy days you will find her dancing with her umbrella.

Kirsti is the author of:

The Raindrop Who Couldn't Fall

The Raindrop Who Couldn’t Fall

FIND KIRSTI CALL:

Website
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Writing Prompt:

Take a few minutes right now to incorporate questions, wonder, surprise, opinion and word play in ten first sentences.  These sentences might just spark an idea for an entire story.  Also, consider the first sentence of your work in progress.  How can you make it irresistible?

 

Kirsti will be giving away one copy of …

The Raindrop Who Couldn’t Fall

 

to those of you who PRE-REGISTERED, COMMENT on this post, and COMPLETE the challenge.

Go to this RAFFLECOPTER LINK TO ENTER into the drawing to win under Kirsti’s post!

 

Missed a SUMMER SPARK? Don’t worry, you can find them here:

Day 1: In Celebration of Summer Magic  by Kelly Milner Halls
Day 2:  The Power of Doodling  by Alison K. Hertz
Day 3: Cause & Effect  by Alayne Kay Christian
Day 4: How to be a Marketing Ninja  by Corey Rosen Schwartz
Day 5: A Visual Writing Prompt: Begin at the End  by Julie Gribble
Day 6: The Final Word  by Jodi Moore
Day 7: Inspiration Station  by Susanna Hill
Day 8: Voice and Word Choice in Picture Books by Tara Lazar
Day 9: Platform Building Can You Build It? Yes, You Can!  by Tracey M. Cox
Day 10: 5 Ways to Hook Your Reader with Your Very First Line  by Kirsti Call
Day 11: Burning Down the House aka Revision by Donna Earnhardt
Day 12: Persistence  by Donna M. McDine
Day 13: Writing Your Way to a Spark  by Kris Dinnison
Day 14: Hope In Your Heart  by Carol Gordon Ekster
BONUS: What Songs Rock Your World?  by Claire Rudolf Murphy
THAT’S A WRAP!
Follow-up #1: TIPS
Follow-up #2: 9 Ways to Tighten Your Story
Prize Announcement: Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!

#summersparks. DAY 8: Voice and Word Choice in Picture Books by Tara Lazar

First, let me apologize. My laptop isn’t charging properly and I’m formatting this post from my tablet. Please excuse any and all formatting problems. Now, onto Tara’s post:

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Voice and Word Choice in Picture Books
by Tara Lazar

 

No, I didn’t mean for the title of this blog to rhyme. Sadly, I don’t write in rhyme. So if I don’t bang out a jaunty beat with fancy-schmancy stanzas, how I do inject FUN into my manuscripts?

With my word choice. (Choices? Choice? Whatevs. You get what I mean.)

We writers hear a lot about the importance of voice, but what exactly does “having a unique voice” mean?

Let’s ask some of our favorite cartoon characters.

“What’s up, Doc?”

“D’oh!”

“Curse you, Perry the Platypus!”

 

Now, did Bugs say, “How are you doing?” Nope. That’s too boring and expected, right? Anyone can say that. But the moment you hear, “What’s up, Doc?” you KNOW who is speaking (and crunching on a carrot).

 

Voice is all about your word choice. (Darn, there goes that pesky rhyme again.) And when I say word choice, I don’t just mean how your characters speak. I mean the entire linguistic tempo of your tale.

 

See? That was word choice right there. I could have said “rhythm of your story” but instead I chose to alliterate with “tempo of your tale”. That’s far more entertaining, right? Your tongue gets to tango with the t’s.

 

Besides alliteration, there are other trusty techniques to try:

· Onomatopoeia—BAM! BASH! KA-BOOM!

· Internal Rhyme—“A monster threesome is more gruesome than a twosome.” (from my book THE MONSTORE—hey, maybe I do rhyme!)

· Repetitive Refrain—a phrase that’s repeated so your readers can anticipate its appearance and join in the read-aloud. Instead of a character catchphrase, this is your book’s catchphrase.

 

Also check out word tools, like the book “L is for Lollygag: Quirky Words for a Clever Tongue” or my own list of 200+ cool words [link to http://taralazar.com/2014/06/09/list-of-200-fun-cool-and-interesting-words/%5D.

Contrary to popular belief, you CAN utilize difficult words in picture books, as long as you don’t add too many and cause your reader to stumble and give up. The placing of the word in context helps teach it. And if it’s a word like hootenanny, it’s a heckuva lotta fun to say, too.

I always keep a thesaurus handy when I’m writing. If I stick in a boring word like RUN, I can always go back and consider DART, SCAMPER or SCURRY instead.

(And if you have an iPad, try the Wordflex app. It’s a visual thesaurus that lets you climb word trees and branches with a swipe of your finger.)

Remember these things when your language feels too common, as if anyone could write what you did. You want your manuscript to stand out, to be remembered, to be irresistible.

You want an editor to say,  “Sufferin’ succotash! What a story!”

Tara Lazar

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Street magic performer. Hog-calling champion. Award-winning ice sculptor. These are all things Tara Lazar has never been. Instead, she writes quirky, humorous PICTURE BOOKS featuring magical places that adults never find.

Her debut picture book, THE MONSTORE, is available now from Aladdin/Simon & Schuster. Her other BOOKS coming soon are:

  • I THOUGHT THIS WAS A BEAR BOOK (Aladdin/S&S 2015)
  • LITTLE RED GLIDING HOOD (Random House Children’s, 2015)
  • 7 ATE 9: THE UNTOLD STORY (Disney*Hyperion, 2016)
  • NORMAL NORMAN (Sterling, 2016)

Tara is represented by Ammi-Joan Paquette of the Erin Murphy Literary Agency.

Her last name rhymes with “bazaar”—you can listen to Tara pronounce her name on TeachingBooks.net. She’s not Tara Laser-beam (although that would be awesome).

5 Unusual Facts About Tara:

And the not so unusual stuff…

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Tara loves children’s BOOKS. Her goal is to create books that children love.

She writes PICTURE BOOKS and middle grade novels. She’s written short stories for Abe’s Peanut and is featured in Break These Rules, a book of life-lesson ESSAYS FOR teens, edited by author Luke Reynolds.

Tara created PiBoIdMo (Picture Book Idea Month) as the picture book writer’s answer to NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month). PiBoIdMo is held on this blog every November. In 2013, PiBoIdMo featured 1,150 participants and over 100,000 web hits.

Tara was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis in 2010 and has permanently lost feeling in her feet and legs. She has an inspirational story to share about overcoming a devastating illness to achieve your goals and dreams. Tara can speak to groups big and small, young and old—just contact her for more information.

She’s a member of SCBWI and speaks at conferences and events regarding picture books, brainstorming techniques, and social media for authors (backed by 20 years experience in internet marketing, from the time when gophers and usenet trumped the web). Her former career was in high-tech marketing and PR.

She also teaches for The Writer’s Circle Workshops.

Tara is a life-long New Jersey resident. She lives in Somerset County with her husband and two young daughters. If they had a dog, it would be a small white fluffy thing named Schluffy.

 

Tara is the author of:
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FIND TARA:

Website/Blog
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Writing Prompt:

Hey everyone! Tracey here. For today’s writing prompt I thought it would be fun to give you a set of words. Choose at least three to place in your story.

sparked
ka-pow
crackle
juicy
splash
bounce
sun
fire works
search
skreeeeeee

Happy writing!

Don’t forget to leave a comment and let us know what type of lyrical language, linguistic lingo, or catch phrases get your attention.

 

Missed a SUMMER SPARK? Don’t worry, you can find them here:

Day 1: In Celebration of Summer Magic  by Kelly Milner Halls
Day 2:  The Power of Doodling  by Alison K. Hertz
Day 3: Cause & Effect  by Alayne Kay Christian
Day 4: How to be a Marketing Ninja  by Corey Rosen Schwartz
Day 5: A Visual Writing Prompt: Begin at the End  by Julie Gribble
Day 6: The Final Word  by Jodi Moore
Day 7: Inspiration Station  by Susanna Hill
Day 8: Voice and Word Choice in Picture Books by Tara Lazar
Day 9: Platform Building Can You Build It? Yes, You Can!  by Tracey M. Cox
Day 10: 5 Ways to Hook Your Reader with Your Very First Line  by Kirsti Call
Day 11: Burning Down the House aka Revision by Donna Earnhardt
Day 12: Persistence  by Donna M. McDine
Day 13: Writing Your Way to a Spark  by Kris Dinnison
Day 14: Hope In Your Heart  by Carol Gordon Ekster
BONUS: What Songs Rock Your World?  by Claire Rudolf Murphy
THAT’S A WRAP!
Follow-up #1: TIPS
Follow-up #2: 9 Ways to Tighten Your Story
Prize Announcement: Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!

#summersparks DAY 6: The Final Word by Jodi Moore

Summer Sparks

The Final Word
by Jodi Moore

 

There’s a lot of attention paid to first lines. As readers, we undoubtedly appreciate them. As writers, we strive for them, revising over and over until we capture the Very Best One. They can be the gateway between snagging an agent or editor (possibly a contract!) and a near miss.

An opening line not only serves as a first impression, it’s also a promise of what’s to come. You make a pact with your reader, one on which you must deliver. If the first line hooks readers, but there’s not enough substance to keep them there, they will abandon you.

Now, imagine the first line sparkles. The body builds to an exciting climax, captivating readers, imploring them to invest their time, their minds, their hearts. And then…the denouement. The readers’ takeaway. The promise fulfilled.

At least that’s the plan.

How many times have you immersed yourself in something completely…only to have the final line fall flat? You may feel underwhelmed. Disappointed. Even cheated.

In my opinion, a last line is just as – if not more – important than a first.

A good book is a feast for the soul: the first sentence analogous to a delectable appetizer; the body of the work, the sumptuous main course; the final line, a rich dessert. The closing words should melt on the tongue like a fine confection, offering just the right amount of substance, just the right amount of sweetness. But if the ice cream is granular, the cheesecake dry, and/or the coffee bitter, your guests leave with a bad taste in their mouths.

Not exactly the last, nor the lasting, impression you want.

So, how do you write a grand finale? Sadly, there’s no magic formula. As with any line, you first need to write it down. Then you must revise, revise, revise. When it’s the best you think it can be, share it with your critique buddies. What is their takeaway? Is it what you’d hoped? If not, repeat the process.

Of course, it helps to learn from the experts – those authors, and their works, that resonate with you. Here’s the fun part. You get to research, a.k.a. READ!

To get you started, I’ve offered some examples here. And while this blog series is predominantly for picture book writers, I’ve included samples from a variety of work to “illustrate” my point. A good line is a good line. Keep in mind that the final (punch) line in a picture book can be an illustration. Don’t be fooled. It is a line in every sense of the, um, non-word. A great example of this? Mustache Baby by Bridget Heos. Make sure you give your artists the freedom to make a statement.

 

Last lines can be:

  • Affirming: “I thought I could.” – The Little Engine That Could (Watty Piper)
  • Inspiring: “We can all dance,” he said, “when we find music that we love.” – Giraffes Can’t Dance (Giles Andreae)
  • Empowering: “Let me tell you about it.” – Speak (Laurie Halse Anderson)
  • Reassuring: “Max stepped into his private boat and waved goodbye and sailed back over a year and in and out of weeks and through a day and into the night of his very own room where he found his supper waiting for him – and it was still hot.” – Where The Wild Things Are (Maurice Sendak)
  • Quiet: “Good night noises everywhere.” – Goodnight Moon (Margaret Wise Brown)
  • Loud: “When you join in, there’s so much noise I have to leave the room!” – Yip! Snap! Yap! (Charles Fuge)
  • Humorous Twist: “I suppose there’s another nightmare in my closet, but my bed’s not big enough for three.” – There’s A Nightmare In My Closet (Mercer Mayer)
  • Persuasive: “Then the Lorax and all of his friends may come back.” – The Lorax (Dr. Seuss)
  • Hopeful: “I don’t know where there is, but I believe it’s somewhere, and I hope it’s beautiful.” – Looking For Alaska (John Green)
  • Uplifting: “I turn away, knowing that I might never get to see Julie Murphy ever again. But I will know her for the rest of my life.” – One For The Murphys (Lynda Mullaly Hunt)
    (I know, I know. *hangs head in shame* I’ve presented two lines here. But when two lines are so dependent upon each other, featuring one without its mate would be, well, wrong.)
  • Cautionary: “And after dinner…we take the principal’s note very seriously.” – Too Much Glue (Jason Lefebvre)
  • Thought Provoking: “We’ll leave the kid with the raised up shoe; what do you think that kid should do?” – Hey, Little Ant (Phillip M. and Hannah Hoose)
  • Silly: “We were all having so much fun on the hill while Little Bo Peep got the blame.” – Little Bo Peep by the Sheep (as told to Priscilla Lamont)
  • Circular: “And chances are if he asks for a glass of milk, he’s going to want a cookie to go with it.” – If You Give A Mouse A Cookie (Laura Numeroff)
  • Rhythmic: “They rock and rock and rock to sleep.” –The Going To Bed Book (Sandra Boynton)
  • Sad (yes, even picture books can be poignant): “I watched the water ripple as the sun set through the maples and the chance of a kindness with Maya becoming more and more forever gone.” – Each Kindness (Jacqueline Woodson)
  • Happy: (Don’t we all love a happy ending?) “And everyone was all smiles. Especially you-know-who.” Nugget & Fang (Tammi Sauer)
  • Esoteric: “Goodbye, I say, goodbye, as I disappear little by little into the middle of the middle of my own spectacular now.” – The Spectacular Now (Tim Thorp)
  • Infinite (promising new adventure): “And off she went.” – Cloudette (Tom Lichtenheld)
  • Universal: “All the world is all of us.” – All The World (Liz Garton Scanlon)

I could go on and on, but you get the idea. (Many thanks to my local library and bookstore for allowing me to camp out in their aisles and to my awesome writer buddy friends for chiming in with some of their favorites!)

What makes these lines so strong, so timeless, is that they leave us thinking about the book and its characters long after the last page is turned. They melt on our tongues, tickle our funny bones and/or nest in our hearts.

Look, I know how exciting it feels to see the finish line looming ahead. But writing isn’t a race. It’s a journey. There’s no need to rush. Savor those last strides to the end. Chill for a bit. Have some chocolate. Let things marinate. Observe what’s around you. Check with trusted readers to make sure you’re moving in the right direction. Then, when you’re ready to continue, plant your feet carefully. You want those final footprints to have a huge impact.

Finally, as you rework your ending, remember that resolutions in stories do not have to tie up all loose ends. In fact, I believe they shouldn’t. Real life doesn’t work that way. We don’t want or need you to fix everything.

 

Except maybe your last line.

 

What are some of your favorites?

 Jodi Moore

Jodi Moore

Jodi considers books, along with chocolate, to be one of the main food groups. She writes both picture books and young adult novels, hoping to challenge, nourish and inspire her readers by opening up brand new worlds and encouraging unique ways of thinking.

Jodi is the proud and (admittedly) neurotic mother of two incredibly talented young adults and never ceases to be amazed at how far the umbilical cord really will stretch. She lives in central PA with her always supportive best friend/husband, Larry, two laughing doves, and an ever-changing bunch of characters in her head. In addition to reading, writing, and chocolate, Jodi enjoys music, theater, dancing, the beach, and precious time spent with her family.

Finally, Jodi thinks it would be really cool if one of her stories eventually became a Disney or Universal movie or theme park ride. Or a Broadway musical.
Just puttin’ it out there.

Jodi is the author of:

DRAGON hi res cover 2When Dragon Moves In

Good News Nelson hi res
Good News Nelson
&

WHEN A DRAGON MOVES IN AGAIN (Flashlight Press) is coming Fall 2015

FIND JODI MOORE:

Website
Facebook
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Writing Prompt:

It’s been said that hindsight is 20:20. Can you write a story based on a final sentence? Try it with this prompt:  “I told you so”, she said, and flashed a smile a mile wide.

 

Missed a SUMMER SPARK? Don’t worry, you can find them here:

Day 1: In Celebration of Summer Magic  by Kelly Milner Halls
Day 2:  The Power of Doodling  by Alison K. Hertz
Day 3: Cause & Effect  by Alayne Kay Christian
Day 4: How to be a Marketing Ninja  by Corey Rosen Schwartz
Day 5: A Visual Writing Prompt: Begin at the End  by Julie Gribble
Day 6: The Final Word  by Jodi Moore
Day 7: Inspiration Station  by Susanna Hill
Day 8: Voice and Word Choice in Picture Books by Tara Lazar
Day 9: Platform Building Can You Build It? Yes, You Can!  by Tracey M. Cox
Day 10: 5 Ways to Hook Your Reader with Your Very First Line  by Kirsti Call
Day 11: Burning Down the House aka Revision by Donna Earnhardt
Day 12: Persistence  by Donna M. McDine
Day 13: Writing Your Way to a Spark  by Kris Dinnison
Day 14: Hope In Your Heart  by Carol Gordon Ekster
BONUS: What Songs Rock Your World?  by Claire Rudolf Murphy
THAT’S A WRAP!
Follow-up #1: TIPS
Follow-up #2: 9 Ways to Tighten Your Story
Prize Announcement: Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!

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