Tuesday Tip: Paying It Forward

one-lovely-blog

Paying it forward

Sometimes you never know when you have helped people. Sometimes you do. Being recognized isn’t the reason why I have been posting though. I have learned things… sometimes (more than most) the hard way. When I was starting out, I had a few people who were gracious to me. They answered questions and gave me some helpful hints. One author wrote to me to say thank you for my kind words about her. *fan girl scream*

Last week I was pleasantly surprised by Keila Dawson. She nominated me for the ONE LOVELY BLOG AWARD.

THANKS YOU LOTS AND LOTS AND WHOLE BUNCHES, KEILA!

I think you rock too!

I nominate the following bloggers, because I find them paying it forward and just want to say, “You guys RAWK!” Thank you for the time and dedication you put into the KidLit Community! Take a moment to visit their blogs and you will definitely find useful information and inspiration.

  1. Julie Hedlund (12×12 Founder)
  2. Susanna Leonard Hill (PPBF & Making PB Magic)
  3. Tara Lazar (PiBoIdMo Founder)
  4. Carrie Charley Brown (ReFoReMo Founder)
  5. Beth Stillmore (Writer and Champion of Writers)
  6. Kathryn Howes (#RaisingReaders, Writer)

Now, I’m suppose to share…

7 things people might not know about me: 

  1. I was a cheerleader in elementary school and can still do a split.
  2. I know how to snowboard and rollerskate.
  3. My eyes are so brown, they are almost black.
  4. When I was little, I wanted to be a Roller Derby Queen when I grew up. Or a mime. HA!
  5. I can play the keyboard and use to be in a band.
  6. My favorite class in elementary school was Performing Arts. I love to draw, paint, create puppets, perform, etc!
  7. I know how to yodel.

 

Pay it forward! Here are the rules for accepting this award:

  • Thank the person who nominated you for the award.
  • Add the One Lovely Blog logo to your post.
  • Share 7 things about yourself.
  • Nominate up to 15 bloggers you admire and inform the nominees by commenting on their blog.

Well done fellow bloggers! Pass it on!

:::LEAVE ME A COMMENT:::
Let me know what you think about my crazy 7 things.
What other blogs do you find valuable?

Until next time…

Happy Writing!
~t

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Newsletter sign-up page.
Shaping Up The Year book       RibbertsWayHome8x300[1]       LGHL-small       justthethingtobe8x300       ADT-8x150       Arachnabet

~ HAPPY NEW YEAR ~ from Tracey M. Cox

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~Happy New Year~

Welcome to 2015!

I know many of you are focusing on your New Year’s Resolutions, and I do have a few of my own, but today I like to reflect back on the past year and see where I have grown and what I have accomplished.

  • Platform Building
    My goal for 2014 was to establish myself on the internet and become comfortable with what I stand for. Pre-2014 when you did a search on “Tracey M. Cox” you would find a different author. Now I have at least 2 pages full of articles, videos, social media contact, etc where you can find me. My platform? How to market with little to no money is still in its infancy, but I know the direction it is heading in and I feel confident in where it is going.
  • Better Content
    I’ve done research and feel my output is so much better this year. I hope others learn from me and can pass it forward too. Better content also builds on platform. I hope to be known as a trusted source and someone who loves to bounce ideas off with.
  • Marketing
    THIS was a biggie for me. I’ve learned to toot my own horn. Carry business cards and books with me. Not to be shy about telling others I write AND love it!  🙂  I also am learning the fine line of marketing and being pushy. Nobody wants to be battered over the head and I don’t want to be the person you see and want to run from.  😉
  • Writing
    My writing has improved so much this year. Researching again and again. Critique groups!!!!!!!!! Taking classes. All this, and an open mind, has contributed to my writing this year.
  • Friendships
    I’ve lost some this year. Some by death, others by their choice. I don’t know which is harder. Still, you have to learn to let go.
    I’ve gained some this year. There are some wonderful people I can’t wait to get to know better.
    Then there are the ones who have remained a constant in my life. I’m thankful for all they have given me. I only hope they feel the same about me.

So what is up with this year?

I’ll be keeping up with the same schedule:
Monday – Marketing
Tuesday – Tips
Wednesday – www.
Thursday – Thinking
Friday – Features (when I have some volunteers)
So two to three posts a week.  🙂  I plan on going into better depth and expanding my knowledge on marketing and kidlit. I hope to have a few surprises this year too. *fingers crossed*

What I hope to accomplish past this blog?

  • Learn to use social media more effectively.
  • Get an agent
  • Book contract
  • Work on writing
  • Work on illustrating
  • Books Love & Taters Book Festival (4th annual) to be bigger and better this year

I hope to see you into the year too!

:::LEAVE ME A COMMENT:::
Let me know what you would love to achieve this year.
What are some things you accomplished in 2014?
How do you plan to build on last year?

Until next time…

Happy Writing!
~t

*Don’t miss one post! Email sign-ups are over here —>
**Did you enjoy this post? Feel free to LIKE, SHARE, and COMMENT ON THIS POST.  Easy, peasy buttons found  below.
***Sign up for my  N E W S L E T T E R ! I will be sharing writing challenges and other tidbits related to the kidlit industry. Click  ~HERE~  to be directed to my Newsletter sign-up page.

CELEBRATE PICTURE BOOKS!!!!

Read!!!Celebrate Picture Books!!!

It’s November and that means it’s Picture Book Month

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And it’s Picture Book Ideas Month…

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Can you hear me cheering?????? */*  */*  */*

Take time to read a great picture book every day. If you are a writer or illustrator, click on the PiBoIdMo banner above and join Tara Lazar’s month long idea generating adventure. Today is the first day and sign-ups go through this week. So it’s not too late to join.

I’ll be journaling about PiBoIdMo this month and would love to see a few others join me in the adventure.

:::LEAVE ME A COMMENT:::
Let me know what you are going to do to celebrate picture books.

Happy Writing!
~t

*Don’t miss one post! Email notifications sign-up is over here —>
**Like this post? Feel free to LIKE, COMMENT, and SHARE. Easy, peasy buttons below.

www.Wednesday… Your Appearance Matters

Your Appearance Matters

 

I know several people have asked about setting up for video and what they should do. I thought, being the picture book writer that I am, I could SHOW better than TELL. *wink, wink. You see what I did there, right?!?*

So here is a video of how you don’t want to come across:

 

Yes, I went out on a limb. Nooooo, I don’t like everyone seeing me frizzy do.   😉    But I did it so you can see some big ol’ no-nos.

NOW, onto better things. What do you need to do and how do you want to come across? Let’s see if this is any better?

Better? I hope so.  🙂

Well you heard the video…

:::LEAVE ME A COMMENT:::
Let me know what you think of the videos. Did I do a good job???
What else do you do with your videos?
Questions and comments are welcomed!

Until next time…

Happy Writing!
~t

*Don’t forget to sign-up for email updates! Enter your email over here —>
**Feel free to LIKE, SHARE and COMMENT on this post! Easy, peasy buttons below.

#summersparks DAY 15 BONUS POST: What Songs Rock Your World? by Claire Rudolf Murphy

 

Summer SparksWhat Songs Rock Your World?
by Claire Rudolf Murphy

 

Music can be a powerful tool in our lives, and in our writing. Think about it. We’re always singing or dancing at special times– birthdays, weddings, graduations, funerals. Music can make us feel things that words alone cannot. It wasn’t until my last two books that I realized just how much it could enhance my own writing and how much I loved singing in my own life. While researching a book on women’s suffrage set in California I ran across a suffrage verse written to the well-known tune “My Country Tis of Thee.” My story morphed into an historical fiction picture book, so I had my two girl characters sing this verse as they marched in a suffrage parade. And when I did readings for my book when it was published, I asked the crowd to sing along with me. It also got me thinking about whether other protest groups had written verses to this song.

I am a NF history geek, so for years I had been researching protestors from many races and religions who had stood up for equal rights throughout our country’s history. Had other groups written verses to this song, I wondered? Sure enough they had and before I knew it, I had uncovered a terrific structure for a nonfiction book that I had been struggling with for a long time. Singing the verses at readings and getting others, especially younger people, singing, too, and writing their own verses to the song, has been great fun. Two choirs here in Spokane recorded the verses from the book, and it gives me great delight just to listen to them on my web site.

But enough about me. This is your month to come up with new writing ideas and bring new energy to your work. Since I am the last post of this Summer Sparks series, here is a list of suggestions of how to bring music into your writing life. A prompt follows the list.

 

  • If you listen to music while writing, come up with your writing anthem this month or even an entire play list to get your creativity pumping every day. I need absolute quiet, but before and after the work, a musical interlude brings energy.
  • Think about a manuscript you are working on. Where could you musical details in the story line? Snippets of a song, a character who plays an instrument, a character’s flashback brought on by a song. Even if you write nonfiction, music can be a part of a biography or event.
  • Because music brings me joy and uses another part of my brain, I have decided to join a women’s choir next fall. How about you? What activity, musical or other, could feed another part of your brain and make it stronger when you return to writing?
  • Opera singers use a term called tessitura (Italian for “texture”), to define the most comfortable range for a singer’s voice. Take a look at some of your manuscripts. Has the voice in each one found its tessitura? Or is there more work to be done?

 

Writing Prompt:

Make a list of ten memories from your life triggered by or focused around music. Such as driving along in the summertime listening to the Beach Boys, your worst birthday party, the song at a relative’s funeral. Free write on one of these memories for five minutes. Try to include other senses besides sound – sight, taste, touch, and smell.

Now study your list again and next to each memory, write down a scene you could build into one of your writing projects.

 

As we close up Summer Sparks, let’s sing out for Tracey Cox for her inventive program to encourage us all to dig deeper and find the music in our stories. Thanks, Tracey.

 

Claire Rudolf Murphy

Claire Rudolf Murphy

 

 

Claire is the author of:
My Country Tis Of Thee
&
Wild Garden JKT

FIND CLAIRE:

Website
Blog
Facebook

 

:::LEAVE A COMMENT:::
Do you use music to find inspiration?
What background noise (if any) do you like to have?
What other things do you use that hasn’t been discussed?

 

Missed a SUMMER SPARK? Don’t worry, you can find them here:

Day 1: In Celebration of Summer Magic  by Kelly Milner Halls
Day 2:  The Power of Doodling  by Alison K. Hertz
Day 3: Cause & Effect  by Alayne Kay Christian
Day 4: How to be a Marketing Ninja  by Corey Rosen Schwartz
Day 5: A Visual Writing Prompt: Begin at the End  by Julie Gribble
Day 6: The Final Word  by Jodi Moore
Day 7: Inspiration Station  by Susanna Hill
Day 8: Voice and Word Choice in Picture Books by Tara Lazar
Day 9: Platform Building Can You Build It? Yes, You Can!  by Tracey M. Cox
Day 10: 5 Ways to Hook Your Reader with Your Very First Line  by Kirsti Call
Day 11: Burning Down the House aka Revision by Donna Earnhardt
Day 12: Persistence  by Donna M. McDine
Day 13: Writing Your Way to a Spark  by Kris Dinnison
Day 14: Hope In Your Heart  by Carol Gordon Ekster
BONUS: What Songs Rock Your World?  by Claire Rudolf Murphy
THAT’S A WRAP!
Follow-up #1: TIPS
Follow-up #2: 9 Ways to Tighten Your Story
Prize Announcement: Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!

#summersparks DAY 11: Burning Down the House by Donna Earnhardt

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Burning Down the House (aka Revision)
By Donna Earnhardt

 

In 1958, George Plimpton interviewed Ernest Hemingway and asked about his rewriting process. This is part of that interaction:

INTERVIEWER: How much rewriting do you do?

 

HEMINGWAY:  It depends. I rewrote the ending to Farewell to Arms, the last page of it, thirty-nine times before I was satisfied.

 

INTERVIEWER: Was there some technical problem there? What was it that had stumped you?

 

HEMINGWAY: Getting the words right.

— The Art of Fiction No. 21,

Paris Review, Spring 1958, No. 18

 

It is my opinion that revision can be just as hard as writing the original story. And sometimes, even harder.

 

The Process

There’s this thing I do that drives my kids batty enough to grow wings and hang upside down in caves.

I don’t make them dissect Hemingway’s work or memorize Shakespeare over the summer. I don’t make them scrub the bathroom floor with a toothbrush or wash their clothes by hand in the creek.

So what is the terrible, horrible, no good thing that I do?

I ask my kids to listen to all manuscript revisions. It’s part of my process. And they usually indulge me. I pay them in chocolate, so it’s a win-win. But does it really help? Yes… and no.

My early process looks something like this:

1. Write part of the manuscript, reworking it as I go.

2. Finally finish it. Then shuffle a few more things around.

3. Read it aloud to my kids.

4. Watch their faces, then have them give feedback

5. Rewrite parts that were not received as they should have been. Rearranging what I can.

6. Reread it to the kids.

7. Note their giggles… and their silence.

8. Feed them chocolate.

9. Promise I won’t read it but a couple more times.

10. Tweak again, then read it aloud one last time

11. START TRUE/DEEP REVISIONS.

Notice that my true revisions don’t start until after the early revision. And if I’m being honest with myself, my early revision is more like rearrangement.

Rearrangement of my manuscript is the equivalent of moving around my couch, lamp and table in my house. Same stuff, different place. Maybe I get rid of the junk on top of the entertainment center. It feels a lot cleaner. But it’s the same ol’, same ol’.  In my manuscript, (just like in my house), moving stuff around happens all the time. So that can be part of the process of revision. But it is NOT true revision.

My true revisions don’t start until after I’ve already written a rough draft, read it aloud a few times and rearranged some stuff. True revision looks like more like a new couch, newly painted walls and new rugs. (And maybe a few demolished walls!)

Truly, there are days that my revision looks like gutting the whole house. I might salvage the beginning, middle and end. But even those are subject to the recycling pile. I’ve even considered burning the whole thing down and starting from scratch. Unless, of course, I have a perfect first draft.

But let me be honest… that’s never happened.

So while I’m gutting my masterpiece, what are some things that help me work through the process without banging my head against a newly painted wall?

· I ask my critique buddies for honest (and sometimes brutal) critiques. They can see things that I am temporarily blind to. I get a type of “see-sickness”. They help bring my vision back in focus.

· I am willing to hear with my head AND my heart that my story has parts that stink. If my characters are shallow, I need to know. If my plot is weak, I need to strengthen it. If my premise is tired, it’s my job to fix it. I don’t need to waste precious time trying to defend my manuscript. Either it works, or it doesn’t. And if it doesn’t, I need to make it work.

· I read my work backwards. Yes, it sounds weird. But reading the storyline backwards helps me see things that might be out of whack. Reading backwards also helps visualize timeline issues and plot holes.

· If I’m writing a picture book in rhyme, I try to rewrite it in prose. I might end up sticking with the rhyming version, but putting it in prose helps me see where plot issues might be. It also helps me determine if rhyming or non-rhyming is the best vehicle for the story.

· I get rid of characters that don’t move the story along. Even if I love a character, he (or she) might serve only one purpose – such as comedic relief. I can attribute that one characteristic to a more important character, especially if I find out one of my characters is shallow. This could help give that character depth.

· I make sure the beginning, middle and end are solid. If the first page of a book doesn’t grab a reader, the rest of the book might not get the chance to redeem itself. The beginning needs to be unforgettable. The ending needs to make me sad the book is over, but still be satisfying. The middle of the story? It’s like the kitchen. It supplies the reader with the “meat”. Without it, the readers are hungry and angry — hangry. And we know that never ends well.

· I get rid of situations that aren’t appropriate for the story. For instance, in Being Frank, the “carnival scene” was once a school dance. But as my wonderful editor pointed out, this book was aimed at 3-7 year olds. They don’t have to deal with school dances for at least a few more years.

· I make sure my big girl panties are on. This business is tough. We can’t settle for “okay”. We can’t settle for “it’s better than what’s on the bookshelves now”. That is a slippery slope that leads to mediocrity. And mediocrity is not what agents or editors are looking for. I am not suggesting losing your vision in exchange for someone else’s. But we need to be willing to re-vision our story to make the vision come to life.

Some great go-to resources for help with revision:

1. Revision & Self-Editing: Techniques for Transforming Your First Draft Into a Finished Novel by James Scott Bell

2. 9-1-1 help for Revising your Picture book by Cynthea Liu http://www.writingforchildrenandteens.com/revision/revision-9-1-1-for-fiction-picture-books/

3. Second Sight — General Help for all writers of children’s books by Cheryl Klein http://cherylklein.com/second-sight/

 

One last thing… I ran across an interview that Kelly Barnhill gave on John Brown’s blog. She makes a good point that is worth printing and pasting on our computers…

“That’s the magic of revisions – every cut is necessary, and every cut hurts, but something new always grows.”  — Kelly Barnhill

(for more of her interview, check it out here: http://johndbrown.com/2011/02/interview-with-author-kelly-barnhill/)

 

p.s. And if you’re wondering, I read this post aloud to my oldest kiddo. She’s now demanding chocolate.

 DONNA EARNHARDT
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Bio: Donna Earnhardt is the author of Being Frank, illustrated by Andrea Castellani (Flashlight press, 2012). When Donna isn’t homeschooling her three children, chauffeuring them from place to place, or battling the laundry, she’s writing children’s stories, poetry, songs, and mysteries. You might find her fishing the Pee Dee River, hiking in the mountains with her family (while simultaneously keeping an eye out for Bigfoot) or visiting her hometown of Cordova, NC. She lives in Concord, NC, and Being Frank is her first picture book.
DONNA IS THE AUTHOR OF:
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FIND DONNA:

BLOG
Twitter: @Donna_Earnhardt
Facebook

Writing Prompt:
Hi everyone. Tracey here.
One writing exercise I like to do is called scenes from the hat. I gather different characters in one pile, different problems in another one, and setting in a third pile. Place your character pile into a hat, swish around, and pull one. Remove the pile and do the same with the problem and setting piles. Now look at your character, his or her problem, and their setting… Now GO!

Characters
King
Chipmunks
Girl
Boy
Farmer
Skater

Problem
Heir to thorn
Winter
Food
Broken ?
Scared
________

Setting
Forest
Beach
City
Moon
Country
Store

 

Missed a SUMMER SPARK? Don’t worry, you can find them here:

Day 1: In Celebration of Summer Magic  by Kelly Milner Halls
Day 2:  The Power of Doodling  by Alison K. Hertz
Day 3: Cause & Effect  by Alayne Kay Christian
Day 4: How to be a Marketing Ninja  by Corey Rosen Schwartz
Day 5: A Visual Writing Prompt: Begin at the End  by Julie Gribble
Day 6: The Final Word  by Jodi Moore
Day 7: Inspiration Station  by Susanna Hill
Day 8: Voice and Word Choice in Picture Books by Tara Lazar
Day 9: Platform Building Can You Build It? Yes, You Can!  by Tracey M. Cox
Day 10: 5 Ways to Hook Your Reader with Your Very First Line  by Kirsti Call
Day 11: Burning Down the House aka Revision by Donna Earnhardt
Day 12: Persistence  by Donna M. McDine
Day 13: Writing Your Way to a Spark  by Kris Dinnison
Day 14: Hope In Your Heart  by Carol Gordon Ekster
BONUS: What Songs Rock Your World?  by Claire Rudolf Murphy
THAT’S A WRAP!
Follow-up #1: TIPS
Follow-up #2: 9 Ways to Tighten Your Story
Prize Announcement: Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!

#summersparks DAY 9: Building a Platform by: Tracey M. Cox

Summer Sparks

PLATFORM BUILDING

Can You Build It? Yes, You Can!

I want to touch on something that everyone is hearing about right now. PLATFORM BUILDING. I’m going to start with some basic information.   WHAT IS A PLATFORM A platform is quite simply how your audience views you. Are you helpful in the reading community? Do you give great resources for writers or illustrators? Do you offer material for teachers or librarians? Your platform focus should be who you want your audience to be. Your platform will also help build trust between you and your audience. This will create a ripple effect to where people will look for your books, material, advice, and spread word-of-mouth.   WHO NEEDS A PLATFORM EVERYONE needs a platform. I’m serious! If you are an enteprenuer (and that’s what you are writers!!!!), then you need a platform. Your platform will help you get your word out without being so pushy. People will come to understand you and feel they know you by the material you put out. This builds trust.   WHY DO WE NEED A PLATFORM We need a platform to expand our audience. People use different venues for information. By using more than one venue, you can reach more people and have a better chance of improving your search engine optimization on the internet. Who doesn’t want to have their links at the top of the search field?!?   WHERE CAN YOU FIND A PLATFORM Platform building is found on the internet (social media), the material you put out (books, magazine, newspapers), word of mouth, networking, reputation.   WHEN SHOULD YOU START BUILDING YOUR PLATFORM Now! Yes, I said right now. It does not matter if you don’t have a book out or if you have 50 books out. Begin now. Or start over now. Get a direction you want to take and stay on course. The more you have out there (and have it consistent), the more your audience will build trust with you and your products.       So now that you have an idea, let’s think about the building process. Think of PLATFORM BUILDING as a house that your identity lives in. What do you need for a sturdy, stable house? A foundation, material to build with, things to keep your material in place, and a roof.

FOUNDATION AND FRAME WORK:

Website/Blog Yes, you need to have one or both of these. What is the first thing you do when you want to find out information about something? If you are like me, you Google it. Right? Having a website is a solid foundation to where you can place your information in one place. If you have a blog, you can make an about me page where people can get to know you more. This is where people will come back time and again to get the information they need on you. Make it interesting and useful.   BUILDING MATERIAL: Content What do you want to be known for? Think along the lines of the field you are in… Non-Fiction or Fiction. Which children’s genre? Useful information such as agent or publishing information. Maybe you have resources for teachers, parents, or librarians. Do you want to target writers or illustrators? How about helping reluctant readers? There are plenty of ways you can reach people and have a great way of communicating.   KEEPING IT IN PLACE: Social Media Outlets Nail down what and who you want to reach by using social media. There are so many outlets out there. YouTube, FaceBook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, and Instagram are only a few. Try a few out. What I like to do is give it a good week to see if I really like it or not. You will find out what works for you, what you like and dislike, and they best avenues to reach your audience.   ROOF: Keeping it all in place Make sure people can find you easily. I’ve done this by trying to keep my ID consistent with my media outlets. You can find me by searching Tracey M. Cox, traceymcox, or traceymcoxauthor on any of my outlets. Also if you can put all this in one place that is an added plus. Remember your foundation? Yep, I have my links on my website in the top boarder. I also have most of them on my blog.     The thing to remember is it will take time to build your platform. Those of us who seem to be all over the place? Well, we’ve been building for a while. Take it one block at a time. Update often to keep your search engine optimization up. Just keep building, building, building. Before you know it, things will come together and you will have built a great platform that is sturdy and a great house for your identity to live in. :::LEAVE A COMMENT::: Let me know which social media outlets you struggle with? Which would you like to know more about?

Tracey M. Cox

wpid-2012-01-01-18.01.43.jpg Tracey M. Cox has been writing professionally since 2000. She is a children’s author, local liaison for the Southern Breeze region of SCBWI, Founder/Director of Books Love & Taters Book Festival, co-founder (with Julie Gribble) of KidLit TV, and host of SUMMER SPARKS Writing Challenge. She also offers services on critiques with non- rhyming pb ms & as a platform building consultant. She lives in South Georgia with her husband, three children, and various fur-babies.

FIND TRACEY M. COX:

Website Blog Facebook Twitter

WRITING PROMPT:

We are entepreneurs. Maybe some of us were when we were children also. How many of you had a lemonade stand? Or maybe a paper route? I sold flowers… that I clipped from my grandmothers yard… when she wasn’t looking. *I know. BAD, TRACEY! BAD!* Some of us might have volunteered too. Make a list about the different businesses children can do. Now pick three and do some research. See if it’s been written about. Can you think of a unique angle?

Tracey will be giving away your choice of one of her picture books:

ShapingUptheYearcoverart   RibbertsWayHome8x300[1]   LGHL-small   justthethingtobe8x300   ADT-8x150   Arachnabet

to those of you who PRE-REGISTERED, COMMENT on this post, and COMPLETE the challenge.
Go to this RAFFLECOPTER LINK TO ENTER into the drawing to win under Tracey’s post!

Missed a SUMMER SPARK? Don’t worry, you can find them here:

Day 1: In Celebration of Summer Magic  by Kelly Milner Halls
Day 2:  The Power of Doodling  by Alison K. Hertz
Day 3: Cause & Effect  by Alayne Kay Christian
Day 4: How to be a Marketing Ninja  by Corey Rosen Schwartz
Day 5: A Visual Writing Prompt: Begin at the End  by Julie Gribble
Day 6: The Final Word  by Jodi Moore
Day 7: Inspiration Station  by Susanna Hill
Day 8: Voice and Word Choice in Picture Books by Tara Lazar
Day 9: Platform Building Can You Build It? Yes, You Can!  by Tracey M. Cox
Day 10: 5 Ways to Hook Your Reader with Your Very First Line  by Kirsti Call
Day 11: Burning Down the House aka Revision by Donna Earnhardt
Day 12: Persistence  by Donna M. McDine
Day 13: Writing Your Way to a Spark  by Kris Dinnison
Day 14: Hope In Your Heart  by Carol Gordon Ekster
BONUS: What Songs Rock Your World?  by Claire Rudolf Murphy
THAT’S A WRAP!
Follow-up #1: TIPS
Follow-up #2: 9 Ways to Tighten Your Story
Prize Announcement: Winner! Winner! Chicken Dinner!