#SummerSparks Day 9 – Writing Tips from the Big Bad Writer by Pat Miller

Summer Sparks Day 9WRITING TIPS FROM THE BIG BAD WRITER
by Pat Miller

One day, Little Red Writing Hood realized she needed some writing tips. She heard that Granny W was a prolific writer, so Little Red packed a basket of treats and decided to visit her.

When Little Red Writing Hood knocked on Granny W’s door, a gruff voice invited her in. Little Red was shocked to learn that Granny W was a wolf!

She started to say, “Hi Granny W, I need some writing advice…” But her train of thought was derailed by Granny’s appearance, and she blurted, “What big ears you have!”

“Yes my dear,” said Granny W. “And those big ears help me get a lot of my ideas. Keep your ears open—some of my best ideas came from overhearing the TV or a conversation at the Critter Café. But don’t forget about your internal ears. Those are the ones that pick up ideas that flit through your dreams or your imagination. I have a notebook with me at all times, in my pocket, by my bed, even one in the shower! Listen to me: you will not remember unless you WRITE IT DOWN!”

girl with notepad“Good point,” said Little Red Writing Hood. “May I borrow some paper to jot this down?” Granny W motioned her to the desk, which was covered with notebooks.

“Grab a notebook,” said Granny W, “I’m just getting started.”

Little Red wanted to ask Granny how to fix a story once she had the first draft. Instead, she said, “What big eyes you have!”

“I do,” said Granny W, “The better to do my rewrites. First, I read my draft looking for ways to punch up the details. You gotta show—use your eyes—instead of tell! Do that by painting a word picture. What would the reader see? Hear? Get my drift?”

“Right,” said Little Red Writing Hood. “First, you make sure you create visuals.”

“Next you have to squint your eyes up and get tough with that story. That’s when you look over every sentence, every word. Is it doing its job? Does it add to the story? Can I cut it out without hurting the story? Then you gotta slice out the lazy words! Scratch off the dull sentences!” Granny punctuated each sentence with a swipe of her claws.

Little Red’s pencil flew over the paper. She wanted to ask how Granny got the gumption to write every day. “What’s your secret for writing every…” before she finished, she was startled by the proximity of Granny’s pearly whites. She couldn’t help herself. “Granny, what big teeth you have!”

“Big teeth, maybe. But I also have tenacity. Know what that means? It’s the ability to bite into my story every day and not let go until it’s finished!” said Granny W.

“But how? I try to write every day, but it gets overwhelming and then I resist even going to my desk,” said Little Red.

“Small and steady is the secret,” revealed Granny. “Tell yourself you only have to write for 10 minutes a day. Just ten! Now how can you resist sitting down for that little dab of time? After 10 minutes, you can quit for the day. Celebrate. Give yourself a gold star for accomplishing your goal. Of course, you might find yourself writing for more than 10, but that’s not a must.”

“I can write for 10 minutes,” said Little Red Writing Hood. “That’s not scary at all.”

“Do it every day—it adds up quickly. Plus, you feel good about yourself for meeting your goals. Small is better than nothing. Tell you what I’m going to do. I’m going to show you my Star Chart.” Granny W pointed to a cabinet. Open that door and see what’s taped inside.”

“Wow, that’s a lot of stars! What are the two faces for? They aren’t happy or sad,” said Little Red.

“Well, I learned that no matter how big my teeth, how determined my intention, life gets away from me sometimes and I can’t even make my small goal. But I don’t beat myself up. I just draw a face that means try again tomorrow.”

“Got it,” said Little Red. “Take a Bite Daily.”

Little Red started to say something else when BING! a story idea popped into her head. Quickly, she jotted it down. “Granny, here are some goodies for you. But I’ve got an idea burning a hole in my brain. Gotta run!”

As Little Red Writing Hood ran out the door, she heard Granny W say, “What good instincts you have!”

SPARK:

1. Fiction Prompt The best question to ask is “What if?” Choose a folk or fairy tale and turn it on its head.

  • What if Cinderella didn’t want to let the prince try on the glass slipper because she had such ugly feet?

  • What if the three Billy Goats Gruff had the little one go last, and she bested the troll because she was very good at tickling?

  • What if instead of a gingerbread boy it was a mischievous three-year old running from his mother, his babysitter, his preschool teacher, etc.

Make a list of five tales. Next, figure out not one, but three different ways you could twist the story. This is an excellent way to free your imagination from its confines. Then choose one of your 15 ideas to write about.

2. Nonfiction prompt: Your inciting questions are the 5 w’s and how. Go to Important Dates in American History: or Origins of Everyday Things. Make a list of several events or people, and come up with questions for each.

For example:

1886 Geronimo surrenders – Why did he surrender? Who did he surrender to? What happened to him?

Next, choose one you know least about from your list. Do ten minutes of Internet research. Based on what you learned, what hook could you use to tell children about it? One possibility, Geronimo was an American prisoner of war for 23 years. How does that compare with how America treated its prisoners of war in the Civil War, or in one of the World Wars? Another hook: In Geronimo’s formative years, the Mexican government offered $25 for an Apache child’s scalp. How did that affect Geronimo’s outlook on life?

Bonuses

  • Big Teeth: Use this Star Chart to keep track of your own ten-minute tenacity. Choose your favorite color each day you write for 10 minutes. Use the non-judgmental face if you don’t. Just don’t give up! [Ten Minute Tenacity Chart]
  • Big Eyes: Go here  to see the first version of Pat’s first book, Substitute Groundhog, and the final version (written after 32 rejections). You can see that very little remained the same.

ABOUT PAT:

Pat Miller photoPat Miller has been writing since she was a kid, but started getting paid when she began writing on the side as an adult. At the time, she was the mother of three young kids and worked full time as an elementary teacher and school librarian. SO MANY BOOKS!

She now works full time writing children’s books and teaching adults about writing. She is also a certified Master Gardener, and gets some of her ideas while pulling weeds or watering her gardens.

As a freelance writer and contributing editor for LibrarySparks, Pat has published more than 200 professional articles, 20 books for school librarians, and a number of books for children. Three of them are Substitute Groundhog (Junior Library Guild book), Squirrel’s New Year’s Resolution, and her upcoming nonfiction book, The Hole Story of the Doughnut (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, May 2016)

She and her husband have twin sons, a daughter, and six preschool grandkids, including twins. Reading to them and buying them books are two of the joys of being a grandmother. She lives in the Houston area and has an illiterate Jack Russell terrier that lies by her feet when she writes.

LINKS:
Website
Blog
Facebook
NF 4 NF: Children’s Nonfiction Writing Conference

 

:::LEAVE A COMMENT:::
Let me know, are you participating  in this years #SummerSparks writing challenge?
Do you have any interesting places or people in your area?

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2015 Summer Sparks post:

  1. Family Celebration by Tracey M. Cox
  2. Back Where I Come From by Tracey M. Cox
  3. The Benefits of Playdough: Molding your PB Idea Into A Story by Donna L. Martin
  4. Go Jump In a Lake by Tracey M. Cox
  5. Take a Vacay! by Tracey M. Cox
  6. How to Rhyme Right in a Picture Book Manuscript by Nancy Raines Day
  7. Don’t You Know that You Are a Shooting Star? by Tracey M. Cox
  8. Sun Burst by Tracey M. Cox
  9. Writing Tips from the Big Bad Writer by Pat Miller
  10. Get Out! by Tracey M. Cox
  11. Pieces by Tracey M. Cox
  12. Make Your Non-Fiction Leap Off the Page! by Jennifer Swanson
  13. Do the Twist by Tracey M. Cox
  14. Celebrate! by Tracey M. Cox

#SummerSparks Day 3 – The Benefits of Playdough… by Donna L. Martin

Summer Sparks Day 3The Benefits of Playdough: Molding Your PB Idea Into A Story

By Donna L Martin

Image One

 

It doesn’t matter how old I become, I think I will always love the smell and feel of play dough. Life can be full of twisty challenges and hard decisions sometimes but nothing reduces the chaos of a hectic existence like sinking your fingers into a can of the squishy stuff. I even use it to help me take a budding picture book idea and turn it into a fully developed story.

 

CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT

So you’ve Image Twothought up a main character for your picture book. Now what? Do they remain one dimensional or do you add layers personality traits to create a character your readers will connect with? I love making little pizzas and hamburgers with playdough…layering things up until I have turned a simple crust or patty into a masterpiece.

 

ENVIRONMENT

You’ve created a multi layered main characters. Maybe you’ve even created some minor characterImage Threes to go along with it. Now you have to think about the world you will invent to support your story line. Don’t be afraid to use all those bright play dough colors to build a place your main character would be proud to be a part of. Does your main character live under the sea? On a mountain top? Down on the farm? You get to decide where your main character will live…just make sure it’s somewhere your readers will want to be as well.

 

PLOT

SometimImage Foures writers can start out with a great world and a strong main character but end up with nowhere to take them. Their plot just ends up being a jumbled mess of colors with no smooth transitions from point A to point B. I have discovered some of the prettiest colors in play dough land are the ones that come from blending two very different colors into a stronger, more vibrant one. Storylines can evolve in much the same way. With a little brainstorming and a little blending of the best parts of several ideas, writers can create a vision their main character (and their readers) find believable. Then it’s just a matter of laying down the rainbow path for them to follow.

Don’t be afraid to explore the world of play dough. The mashy, mushy, squishy, squashy land of creative play flowing from the worlds of your imagination onto paper or computer screen to be shared with a waiting audience. Just imagine what you can create next!

Image Five

 

SPARK:

Imagine you just bought an antique desk and discovered a hidden compartment with an ornate box hidden inside. You notice the strange design carved on the top and slowly open the box to reveal…

What?

A treasure map leading to the lost city of Atlantis?

A vial of dragon’s blood?

The key to a fairy’s home?

A set of glowing stones?

What could you add to this list of possibilities?

ABOUT DONNA:

author photo

Children’s book author, Donna L Martin, has been writing since she was eight years old. She is a 4th Degree Black Belt in TaeKwonDo by day and a ‘ninja’ writer of children’s picture books, middle grade chapter books and young adult novels by night. Agented by Jessica Schmeidler of GOLDEN WHEAT LITERARY. Donna is a BOOK NOOK REVIEWS host providing the latest book reviews on all genres of children’s books. She is also a book reviewer for Harper Collins Christian Publishing as part of their Book Look Blogger division and a member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers & Illustrators. Donna is a lover of dark chocolate, good stories, and an adoptive mom to 20-pound guard kitty in Knoxville, Tennessee.

STORY CATCHER BOOK COVERLINKS:
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Goodreads
Linkedin
Amazon
Author Email: http://www.donasdays@gmail.com
Story Catcher Fan Club Emai: www.storycatcherfanclub@gmail.com

 

:::LEAVE A COMMENT:::
Let me know, are you participating  in this years #SummerSparks writing challenge?
What types of mediums do you like to use to give you inspiration?

* Don’t miss one post! Email sign-ups are over here —>
* Did you enjoy this post? Feel free to LIKE, SHARE, and COMMENT ON THIS POST.
Easy, peasy buttons found  below.
* Sign up for my  N E W S L E T T E R ! I will be sharing writing challenges and other
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Newsletter sign up page.
Shaping Up The Year book       RibbertsWayHome8x300[1]       LGHL-small       justthethingtobe8x300       ADT-8x150       Arachnabet

2015 Summer Sparks post:

  1. Family Celebration by Tracey M. Cox
  2. Back Where I Come From by Tracey M. Cox
  3. The Benefits of Playdough: Molding your PB Idea Into A Story by Donna L. Martin
  4. Go Jump In a Lake by Tracey M. Cox
  5. Take a Vacay! by Tracey M. Cox
  6. How to Rhyme Right in a Picture Book Manuscript by Nancy Raines Day
  7. Don’t You Know that You Are a Shooting Star? by Tracey M. Cox
  8. Sun Burst by Tracey M. Cox
  9. Writing Tips from the Big Bad Writer by Pat Miller
  10. Get Out! by Tracey M. Cox
  11. Pieces by Tracey M. Cox
  12. Make Your Non-Fiction Leap Off the Page! by Jennifer Swanson
  13. Do the Twist by Tracey M. Cox
  14. Celebrate! by Tracey M. Cox

Thinking Thursday – Peek-A-Boo! Finding Ideas

Finding IdeasPeek-A-Boo! Finding Ideas

I think the number one question I hear from writers (and students at school visits) is: WHERE DO YOU FIND your IDEAS?

Honestly, there isn’t magic words to mumble or a ritual to go through. It is simple though.

payAttention

Really. See things. Hear things. Experience things. Let your senses lead you. There are thousands of stories surrounding you everyday. You only have to take the time to see them. Hear them. Feel them. Explore them.

I’ve written stories on trees, geese, shapes, frogs, and on and on.

Think like a reader. What would they like to see? To do? To know? What are you curious about?

Once you begin the process of really seeing the world around you, there will be ideas that begin to jump at you. So will be crappy, but some will be great. Some will take shape. While others will slip through your fingers like grains of sand.

I wish there was an amazing piece of advice to give you on this subject! I would use it myself. hahaha.  😀

I guess I would say, experience life. Even though we have similar experiences, we don’t process them the same way. We each have a story to tell.

So get writing!

:::LEAVE ME A COMMENT::::
Let me know about your idea process.
Do you know some magical words?
Or have an awesome ritual that works?
^^^ I really want to know!!!  😉
Or do you struggle, like me?

Until next time…

Happy Writing!
~t

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Tuesday Tips – Why Critique Groups Are Important

Why Critique Groups Are ImportantWhy Critique Groups Are Important

You’ve spent hours, days, and years (yes, I said years – even with picture books) on a manuscript.

You’ve gone over it a gazillion times. You finally push yourself back from the computer and declare it ready.

But is it?

You’ve grown accustomed to your characters, their subtle and outlandish flaws, their quirks that make them – them! You have mapped out your setting and know every stone and corner in your story’s world. You know the conflict everything is a part of and everyone one is going through. So can you really “see” your story now???

Chances are, No.

This is where a second (or third or fourth or ???…) set of eyes can come into play. BUT do not get your best friend or your mother or someone close to read it and tell  you what they think. Although there is nothing wrong with them reading it.   😉   Get a group of your peers to look over it.

A critique group is just that… a group of your peers who are willing to give feedback. You, in return, give your opinion on their story too. They are also someone who is pursuing a career in writing and will be able to look at your material more critically than someone who isn’t in the field.

Some people are leery of doing this. They have heard of ideas being stolen. Harsh criticism on work to where the writer is left in tears. There are hurt feelings and deeper scars when it comes to trust.

BUT, BUT, BUT!!! There are people out there (AMAZING people) who are willing and lovely, and who will send out positivity into you and your work. It may take a few tries to find the right people in which you click with. You may have to weed out and resow with new people when a few don’t work. That is part of the process though. When you do find the right people, something will click! You will see that there are brilliant people who will push you further than you thought you could go. They will help your skills improve and the end result will be your career will begin to take shape.

What Should You Look For?

  • Look for someone who is like-minded.
    You want someone who has goals similar to yours. Are you wanting to get published? Find an agent? Just get some words down? Find people who will push you (and you push them) to the next level.
  • Genre.
    A lot of people think if you write a book, you can critique anything. Nope, nope, nope. I tell people it’s like dogs…
    A Chihuahua is a dog, a Lab is a dog, and a St. Bernard is a dog. (yes)
    Would you give them the same food? (no)
    Would you give them the same amount of medicine? (no)
    Do they take up the same amount of room? (no)
    The same amount of upkeep? (no)
    The same is true with your writing. Sure board books, picture books, early readers, chapter books, mid grade, young adult, and new adult are ALL children’s writing. BUT they are different writing styles, how you approach the subject matter, IF you approach the subject matter, word count, and on and on.
  • Rhyming and non-rhyming
    Oh how I love rhyming, but my own critique group will tell you it’s not my strong point. (hahaha, I try.) Rhyming is very tough to do, to keep it within certain parameters, to not force the issue, to not do something just to make it fit, to not write it badly. There are some wonderful people out there that can do this though. Study their work if you choose to do this. Make sure your critique group is on board with you on the rhyming bit too.
  • Time commitment.
    Are you wanting someone who is only going to put 10-15 minutes of thought into a critique or are you wanting more in depth feedback? Line by line or overall thoughts? Nitpick or over-easy remarks? The more in depth someone goes, the more time they will need to spend on your work. (Which they hope you will do the same with theirs.) Make sure it is something you are comfortable with and are able to do.

How To Get Started?

Put a call out or scan around and see if someone else is already looking.

Set up guidelines: What you expect from each other. Turn around time. What needs to be said when sending work. HOW to send work.  etc. The more specific you get, the better your expectations will be.

 

Honestly, I’ve been in a few critique groups. Some have been better than others. I have made some great, great, GREAT friends along the way too. I hope this helps ease your mind about critique groups and helps show how to get the ball rolling too.

:::LEAVE ME A COMMENT:::
Let me know what you think about critique groups?
Are you in one or more?
What have been the benefits/set backs?

Until next time…

Happy Writing!
~t

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Feature Friday: ReFoReMo hosted by Carrie Charley Brown

ReFoReMo2ReFoReMo
Reading for Research Month

We know we love to write. We know we need to learn to write well to be published. So how do we go about to learning? There are classes we can take. Webinars we can watch. Speakers to listen to.

Another great way to learn?  R-E-A-D! Yes, read! By submersing yourself into your genre, you will see what works and what doesn’t. Read the classics to see what has carried them this far. Read the mid-list to see what can make you stay steady. Read the newly published to see what is on the pulse of publishing and how your writing can fit in.

By reading a combination of publishing years you can begin to see the patterns of publishing. Things that are considered ‘classics’ wouldn’t be published now. Stories that are coming out this year might not have been published 10 years ago. Use the current books as mentor text. You will see word count, topics, and trends that are similar and will help direct you to better writing.

Carrie Charley Brown came up with a genius of a plan to help writers collaborate together and learn from each other with mentoring texts. Her and I were talking the other day, and she graciously answered some of my questions:

 

Q1: Name of writing challenge?

Reading for Research Month, or ReFoReMo

Q2: Do you have a website?

Of course!  You can find more information at:

http://www.carriecharleybrown.com/reforemo

Q3: Date of sign-ups?

February 15-March 1

Q4: Date writing challenge runs?

March 1-31

Q5: Why did you come up with this challenge?

I’ve grown as a writer by participating in challenges such as PiBoIdMo, the 12 x 12 Picture Book Challenge, and ReviMo. At the same time, I read a lot of picture books as research tools and I wanted to share that inspiration with others.  

Q6: What do you hope people will gain from this challenge?

Guest author-educators will allow us to step into their shoes as they use picture books as tools. My hope is that picture book writers will gain a deeper understanding of how to use mentor texts to grow as writers. I also hope the consistent practice of reading picture books will immerse them into the form they write.

Q7: What else would you like to include?

Sometimes people don’t realize that fiction takes research, too. I write mainly picture book fiction and could not imagine writing without first understanding what is constantly being released in our market. Writers need to stick together and share. ReFoReMo will allow us to be there for one another in both fiction and nonfiction.

 

About:

IMG_2318

 

Carrie Charley Brown

Carrie Charley Brown juggles ideas every day as a children’s writer, teacher, blogger, and mom. She is the founder of the 2015 ReFoReMo Challenge, or Reading for Research Month. You can learn more about Carrie’s writing journey, her KidLit Services, ReFoReMo, and many other amazing authors and resources, at her blogsite Carrie On… Together!

 

Thanks Carrie!
I am also honored to be one of the Author-Educators for the challenge.   🙂

Hope you all will join us. Click on the link, banner, or ~ HERE~ to take you over there.

:::LEAVE ME A COMMENT:::
Let me know what you think about this post.
Have you read any great picture books lately?
Do you know of any writing challenges you would like to see featured here?

Until next time…

Happy Writing!
~t

* Don’t miss one post! Email sign-ups are over here —>
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Newsletter sign-up page.
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Feature Friday: ReviMo with Meg Miller

ReviMo-logo12-10-2

I WILL REVISE!

Here we are… A NEW YEAR!

Do you have a manuscript or a couple or a few or several manuscripts that need some serious revising?
But that feels like work?
You rather play with the shiny NEW idea?

Pish! Posh! Roll up your sleeves and lets let some red ink fly!

I’m challenging you! Yes, YOU! to submit this year. B-u-u-u-u-u-u-u-t you have to get those crappy first drafts into shape! What better way than to participate in a writing challenge?

ENTER:

Meg Miller

Hi, Meg!
Thanks for stopping by ‘a writers blog by Tracey M. Cox’ and sharing your writing challenge! Here are some Q&A Meg and I had the other day and I wanted to share:

Q1: Name of writing challenge?
A: ReviMo 2015

Q2: Do you have a website?
A: http://www.megmillerwrites.blogspot.com/p/revimo-2015.html

Q3: Date of sign-ups?
A: Last day to sign up 1/11/2015 at 10 pm cst

Q4: Date writing challenge runs?
A: January 11-17, 2015

Q5: Why did you come up with this challenge?
A: In 2013, I had just completed Paula Yoo’s NaPiBoWriWee; I was gearing up to do to Tara Lazar’s PiBoIdMo; and I’d been writing a rough draft monthly for Julie Hedlund’s 12×12 Challenge. I thought, I need to revise all these (crappy, oh so crappy) stories, *Lightbulb* there should be a revision challenge!! So… after coming up with a name for it, inspired by the other great challenges, I set to planning. And in January 2014, I hosted the first ReviMo with help from inspiring guest bloggers and generous sponsors. There have also been many Pre-ReviMo and Petite ReviMo with great posts from writers.
I had a thought at one point that surely there was no new way to talk about revising, but every time I receive someone’s post I am amazed at how our unique perspectives bring a new and fresh take on revising! Which gives me hope for writing, there are new picture book ideas, you just need a fresh perspective!

Q6: What do you hope people will gain from this challenge?
A: I get writer’s block occasionally and I know it’s because I start taking myself and (add stuffy accent here) *my writing* WAY too seriously. I’d like ReviMo to inspire people to play with revisions. This quote from Anne Lamott captures the thought perfectly: “So go ahead and make big scrawls and mistakes. Use up lots of paper. Perfectionism is a mean, frozen form of idealism, while messes are the artist’s true friend.”

Q7: What else would you like to include?
A: Check out our wonderful guest bloggers for ReviMo 2015:
http://megmillerwrites.blogspot.com/p/revimo-2015-guest-bloggers.html
And not only that, but our lovely sponsors have donated some fabulous prizes: http://megmillerwrites.blogspot.com/p/blog-page_7.html
AND (can this get any better??) if you are a ReviMo participant you are eligible for these special offers: http://megmillerwrites.blogspot.com/p/revimo-2015-special-offers.html

 

Thanks Meg!!!
How awesome is that! Not only do you get some of your work closer to submission-ready material, you also have a chance at some amazing prizes. I have already signed up!

Click on the logo above or ~ HERE ~ to sign up for Meg’s ReviMo challenge. You have 2 more days to get in!!!!

:::LEAVE ME A COMMENT:::
Let me know what you think of writing challenges.
Are you going to participate in ReviMo?
What are some challenges you are going to participate in this year?
Are there some you would like to see highlighted here?

Until next time…

Happy Writing!
~t

*     Did you enjoy this post? Feel free to LIKE, SHARE, and COMMENT ON THIS POST.
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industry. Click  ~HERE~  to be directed to my Newsletter sign-up page.

~ HAPPY NEW YEAR ~ from Tracey M. Cox

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~Happy New Year~

Welcome to 2015!

I know many of you are focusing on your New Year’s Resolutions, and I do have a few of my own, but today I like to reflect back on the past year and see where I have grown and what I have accomplished.

  • Platform Building
    My goal for 2014 was to establish myself on the internet and become comfortable with what I stand for. Pre-2014 when you did a search on “Tracey M. Cox” you would find a different author. Now I have at least 2 pages full of articles, videos, social media contact, etc where you can find me. My platform? How to market with little to no money is still in its infancy, but I know the direction it is heading in and I feel confident in where it is going.
  • Better Content
    I’ve done research and feel my output is so much better this year. I hope others learn from me and can pass it forward too. Better content also builds on platform. I hope to be known as a trusted source and someone who loves to bounce ideas off with.
  • Marketing
    THIS was a biggie for me. I’ve learned to toot my own horn. Carry business cards and books with me. Not to be shy about telling others I write AND love it!  🙂  I also am learning the fine line of marketing and being pushy. Nobody wants to be battered over the head and I don’t want to be the person you see and want to run from.  😉
  • Writing
    My writing has improved so much this year. Researching again and again. Critique groups!!!!!!!!! Taking classes. All this, and an open mind, has contributed to my writing this year.
  • Friendships
    I’ve lost some this year. Some by death, others by their choice. I don’t know which is harder. Still, you have to learn to let go.
    I’ve gained some this year. There are some wonderful people I can’t wait to get to know better.
    Then there are the ones who have remained a constant in my life. I’m thankful for all they have given me. I only hope they feel the same about me.

So what is up with this year?

I’ll be keeping up with the same schedule:
Monday – Marketing
Tuesday – Tips
Wednesday – www.
Thursday – Thinking
Friday – Features (when I have some volunteers)
So two to three posts a week.  🙂  I plan on going into better depth and expanding my knowledge on marketing and kidlit. I hope to have a few surprises this year too. *fingers crossed*

What I hope to accomplish past this blog?

  • Learn to use social media more effectively.
  • Get an agent
  • Book contract
  • Work on writing
  • Work on illustrating
  • Books Love & Taters Book Festival (4th annual) to be bigger and better this year

I hope to see you into the year too!

:::LEAVE ME A COMMENT:::
Let me know what you would love to achieve this year.
What are some things you accomplished in 2014?
How do you plan to build on last year?

Until next time…

Happy Writing!
~t

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